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Medicaid

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Amy Goldstein of The Washington Post and Dr. Leana Wen of George Washington University share advice for journalists covering Biden's first 100 days.
Picture of Ida Mojadad
While other options have emerged, Healthy SF helps those who might otherwise fall through the cracks.
Picture of Dan Diamond
For two decades, victims of U.S. nuclear bomb tests fought to obtain the Medicaid eligibility that was promised them. In the waning days of 2020, they won.
Picture of Cassie M. Chew
Four hours after a federal judge ordered his immediate release from custody, on a Tuesday afternoon in April, Euka Wadlington said goodbye to prison life.
Picture of Giles Bruce
Will a Joe Biden presidency lead to real gains in the number of kids with insurance? After COVID-19, the unmet needs among kids will be immense.
Picture of Dan Diamond
The United States used their homeland for nuclear test-bombing, then denied them Medicaid. Now, their way of life in the U.S. heartland has left them prime prey for the pandemic.
Picture of Dan Diamond
After fleeing their homeland scarred by U.S. nuclear tests, Marshall Islanders finally get the health care that was promised them.
Picture of Ida Mojadad
This story was produced by Ida Mojadad, a participant in the 2019 Data Fellowship, who is investigating the efficacy of the health access program Healthy SF in San Francisco. Her other stories include: Workers may get cash payout from medical reimbursement accounts Millions left sitting in medi
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
President-elect Biden will likely move quickly to undo a slew of Trump-era health care policies.
Picture of Tracie Potts
Years of attacks on the ACA leave families in constant fear of losing coverage. The pandemic raises the stakes for millions of people.

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As public health officials like to say, "COVID-19 isn't done with us." And journalists know that we're not done with COVID-19. Apply now for five days of stimulating discussions on the pandemic's disproportionate impact on people of color -- plus reporting and engagement grants of $2k-$10k and five months of mentoring while you work on an ambitious project.

Domestic violence affects tens of millions of Americans every year. Yet media outlets mostly treat incidents as "cops" items, if they cover them at all, as opposed to treating domestic violence as a public health problem. Our free two-day symposium will help journalists understand the root causes and promising prevention, intervention and treatment approaches.  Plus participants will be able to apply for grants to report California-focused projects.

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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