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Medicaid

Picture of Tracie Potts
"Data is the backbone of good reporting, but people make the audience care," writes broadcast reporter Tracie Potts. Here's how she finds the people that make the story.
Picture of Emily Underwood
Poor people, people in isolated, rural areas and minorities are least likely to receive palliative care and counseling about end-of-life decisions. And one-third of U.S. hospitals don’t have a palliative care team.
Picture of Louise McCarthy
Before, LA's community clinics had to have a face-to-face visit to get paid for caring for some of the county's poorest, sickest residents. A new model gives clinics a monthly amount per patient, allowing for better care, leaders say.
Picture of Tracie Potts
2017 National Fellow Tracie Potts gives a behind-the-scenes look at the ever-changing nature of her Fellowship project chronicling health reform across the country.
Picture of Patty  Machelor
Arizona has the some of the strictest guidelines in the nation for welfare benefits. Tucson mother Jessala Grijalva can usually get what she needs for herself and her three children, but she’s found some surprising exceptions.
Picture of Tracie Potts
A tour of four communities across America revealed a common theme when it comes to the health reform: "Over and over we heard the same thing: people feel forgotten. They feel Washington is not listening."
Picture of John Baackes
Proponents of Medicaid work requirements think it would flush freeloaders out of the system. And yet the reality is that most people on Medicaid already work.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
While ACA repeal efforts have stalled, the individual mandate is gone and Medicaid work requirements are proliferating. Two expert observers weigh in on states' growing role in shaping health policy.
Picture of Tracie Potts
Susan Moore has colon cancer. She couldn’t afford transportation to dialysis three times a week. Until recently, she wanted to die. Her story struck reporter Tracie Potts especially hard.
Picture of Rebecca  Adams
Immigrants on edge about broader enforcement under Trump have been skipping appointments and questioning whether enrolling in public health coverage could jeopardize their status.

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