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medical error

Picture of William Heisel
The death certificate helps tells a fuller story of Bill Paxton’s final days. Reporters should make a habit of seeking them out, since they can be revealing repositories of information.
Picture of Paul Sisson

Are California hospitals doing a better job of preventing serious mistakes in the wake of a state program that issues high-profile penalties for such errors? One reporter finds reasons for doubt in the data.

Picture of Paul Sisson

In California, fines up to $125,000 per preventable mistake have not made a significant dent in the number of medical errors. Despite recent gains, the number is still higher than when the state’s program began nine years ago.

Picture of William Heisel

Doug Wojcieszak talks about why doctors should apologize — not clam up — over their medical errors, and why some patients criticize his Sorry Works! program.

Picture of William Heisel

Three more questions you should pursue based on the debate over the SorryWorks! program, which protects doctors who apologize for medical errors that harm patients.

Picture of James Salwitz

An oncologist offers his perspective on medical errors. The driving force is fear and guilt: fear for the mistakes you might make, guilt for the mistakes you already made.

Picture of William Heisel

Should a doctor be able to say sorry to a patient who has been harmed and then avoid the repercussions of the error?

Picture of William Heisel

Efforts to change laws to encourage doctors to apologize for medical errors while avoiding lawsuits have sparked debate over whether patient safety will be compromised. Here's why.

Picture of William Heisel

Sometimes, knowing what's on a person's death certificate can lead to a public benefit. So why do some states make death certificates private and others consider them public documents?

Picture of Suzanne Gordon

Atul Gawande, surgeon and staff writer for The New Yorker, is one of the most prominent voices speaking about patient safety in the United States. But in his latest New Yorker contribution, "Personal Best: Should everyone have a coach?," the "everyone" in question here is, not surprisingly, just the physician.

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The pandemic has thrown into brutal relief the extent to which the U.S. health care system produces worse outcomes for patients of color. And yet there has been scant focus on one of the biggest drivers of structural racism in health care: How doctors and hospitals are paid. In this webinar, we’ll highlight the ways in which the health care system’s focus on money and good grades is shortchanging the health of communities of color. Sign-up here!

U.S. children and teens have struggled with increasing rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior for much of the past decade. Join us as we explore the systemic causes and policy failures that have accelerated the crisis and its inequitable impact, as well as promising community-driven approaches and evidence-based practices. The webinar will provide fresh ideas for reporting on the mental health of youth and investigating the systems and services. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors and a social media consultant to join its team. Learn more about the positions and apply.

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