Skip to main content.

medical technology

Picture of Monya De

Dr. Monya De rounds out her top 10 predictions on what medicine will look like over the decades to come. Not surprisingly, she projects technology to play a big role, from surgical robots to telemedicine.

Picture of Monya De

Electronic medical records held out the promise of a better future, with everyone reaping the benefits. In reality, poorly designed systems slow doctors down, hinder the doctor-patient relationship, and often get things wrong. Doctors and patients deserve better solutions.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Drug shortages still painful for patients, little scrutiny of medical devices, contraception hurdles and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of William Heisel

Check out a Consumer's Union Twitter chat today on the safety (or not) of medical devices.

Picture of Gary Schwitzer

Kudos to reporter Kirsten Stewart of the Salt Lake Tribune for showing how to avoid local boosterism – so often seen when the local health care industry makes an announcement. 

Picture of Heather May

Utah is considered one of the healthiest states in the nation — but not everyone benefits. This is part two in a series examines the wide disparities in health based on residents’ education, ethnicity and environment.

Picture of Ashby Wolfe

Please visit my website at http://www.ashbywolfe.com/ to view my most recent post and further updates.

Most recent site update: 11/8/09
Most recent blog post: 11/4/09

Place-based policy

I recently had the privilege to attend the semi-annual CCLHO (California Conference of Local Health Officers) meeting in Oakland, California. This meeting represents an opportunity for county public health officers (often physicians) to collaborate with each other face-to-face.

Picture of Michelle Levander

Dr. Pam, whom I just began following on Twitter, shares this interesting article about which medicine will define America as we head toward historic health reform. Worth a read. If the New England Journal is having this debate, it suggests a sea change in thinking about medicine and medical technology and its role in improving health for all. Please share your thoughts!

Picture of Admin User

Wayne A. Beach is a professor of communication at SDSU and an associate member of the Cancer Center in the School of Medicine at the University of California, San Diego. His research focuses on conversational and institutional interactions and their convergence, including medical interviewing and how families talk through cancer diagnosis and treatment. Beach has pioneered studies on how family members talk through illness dilemmas, including bulimia and terminal cancer, providing innovative approaches to understanding communication in casual and institutional health care contexts.

Picture of Admin User

Dr. Deyo is the Kaiser Permanente-endowed Professor of Evidence-Based Medicine at the Oregon Health & Science University. Previously, he was a professor of general internal medicine in the departments of medicine and health services at the University of Washington. He was director of the University's Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program, the Center for Cost and Outcomes Research, and the NIH-funded Multidisciplinary Clinical Research Training Program.

Announcements

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

Let us support your next ambitious health reporting project through our National Fellowship program. Apply today.

Nowhere was the massive COVID wave of winter 2021 more devastating than in America’s nursing homes, where 71,000 residents died in the surge. In this webinar, we’ll hear from the lead reporter in the USA Today series "Dying for Care," who will show how an original data analysis and an exhaustive reporting effort revealed a pattern of unnecessary deaths that compounded the pandemic’s brutal toll. Sign-up here!

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth