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Medicare

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Too often, people experience death in ways deeply at odds with how they'd wish to live out their final days. In a recent webinar, a policy expert and journalist shared ideas for how the U.S. healthcare system navigates the end of life.
Picture of Michael  Hochman
In order to see whether heart stents actually improved patients' lives, the VA health care system decided to ask them directly, before and after surgery. But does this approach work?
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Everyone says health care needs more transparency when it comes to outcomes, but how might that work? And what's holding back efforts to improve care by shining more light on health care outcomes?
Picture of David Lansky

The goal of health care spending is to achieve good health results, and that requires measuring and rewarding success. Unfortunately, the measures likely to be used for the next stage of health reform won’t get us there.

Picture of Trudy  Lieberman

Medicare wants to lower payments to doctors who prescribe more expensive drugs and give higher reimbursements to those who use more affordable ones. But the industry pushback has been fierce.

Picture of Paul Sisson

In California, fines up to $125,000 per preventable mistake have not made a significant dent in the number of medical errors. Despite recent gains, the number is still higher than when the state’s program began nine years ago.

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

Leading health policy experts zeroed in on problems with the “pay for performance” health care model in our webinar this week. Here's why they say the program needs to "hit the refresh button," and how reporters can cover it.

Picture of Swati Kapoor

“House calls go back to the origins of medicine, but in many ways I think this is the next generation,” Dr. Patrick Conway, CMS' chief medical officer, recently said. The practice is making a bit of a comeback among high-need patients.

Picture of Trudy  Lieberman

If the government changes the rules of the game to satisfy sellers of Medicare Advantage plans that count on high star ratings for bonus payments, then what good are the ratings? The ratings are "a farce," one critic says.

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

By aggressively documenting a patient’s conditions, insurers can inflate the amount of money they get from Medicare Advantage patients. Here's what reporters should understand about the hidden practice of "upcoding."

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