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mental health

Picture of Jessica Seaman
This essay was awarded an honorable mention in The Denver Post’s teen essay contest as part of an ongoing Crisis Point project on youth suicide in Colorado.
Picture of Almendra Carpizo
Fifteen years ago, 53-year-old Alicia Corrales walked away from the grips of abuse that had occurred most of her life. Today, she not only continues to heal herself but also aims to aid others whose lives have been scarred and bruised by domestic violence.
Picture of Miriam Son
his essay was selected as the second place winner of The Denver Post’s teen essay contest as part of an ongoing Crisis Point project on youth suicide in Colorado.
Picture of Ross Terrell
Georgia’s APEX program is entering its fifth year. It’s the state’s attempt to increase mental health services in both private and public schools. ...
Picture of Matthew Tinoco
The public is paying mightily for homelessness, regardless of whether or not voters support more funding for homeless services and housing.
Picture of Jessica Seaman
Talking about our personal experiences with mental illness can be difficult, even when it’s just among family and friends. But without these stories, how can we begin to understand an issue that is affecting every community across our state?
Picture of Almendra Carpizo
He had called her stupid and dumb. And she made herself believe the belittling and degrading were tolerable — it would pass. Little did she know it would get worse.
Picture of William Heisel
I first became interested in jail suicides when I was reporting on the state prison in Montana, where I found that murders were quite uncommon inside the prison — but suicides were not.
Picture of Adia White
“I have kids telling me still, oh Ms. Henry I lost my stuffed animals that were in the garage and I know that they burned in there and it makes me very sad,” she said. “You know, those little things were people to them.”
Picture of Shirley  Smith

A landmark court decision gives hope to people with mental illness in Mississippi, who are caught up in a dysfunctional mental health system, and their families.

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The wave of attacks against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders has been emotionally gutting for these communities. In our next webinar, we’ll examine the impact of the crisis on the mental health of Asian Americans, especially the women who are often targeted. Join us for a deep discussion to inform your coverage of the crisis and broader reporting on AAPI communities. Sign-up here!

As public health officials like to say, "COVID-19 isn't done with us." And journalists know that we're not done with COVID-19. Apply now for five days of stimulating discussions on the pandemic's disproportionate impact on people of color -- plus reporting and engagement grants of $2k-$10k and five months of mentoring while you work on an ambitious project.

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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