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mental health

Picture of William Heisel

It must have been a slow day at the North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Here’s what we’re reading today:

Uninsured: More than 50 million Americans have no health insurance, according to new U.S. Census data. Kaiser Health News has a convenient roundup of the media coverage.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Foreclosures: Heart palpitations, insomnia, acid reflux: foreclosures can make you sick, according to a new report covered by the San Francisco’s Victoria Colliver.

Flawed Polls: Political science professor Terry Jones examines flaws in media coverage of health care polls in the St. Louis Journalism Review.  

Picture of Jennifer Biddle

Although teen suicide attempts have declined gradually since the 1990s, death by suicide has risen 8 percent among teenagers, according to the most recent statistics from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In fact, it’s the third leading cause of death for teens between the ages of 15 and 19. While each suicide is a unique story, there is a common thread: More than 90 percent of teens who kill themselves show signs of major depression or another mental illness in the year prior to their deaths.

Picture of Jennifer Biddle

Although teen suicide attempts have declined gradually since the 1990s, death by suicide has risen 8 percent among teenagers, according to the most recent statistics from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In fact, it’s the third leading cause of death for teens between the ages of 15 and 19. While each suicide is a unique story, there is a common thread: More than 90 percent of teens who kill themselves show signs of major depression or another mental illness in the year prior to their deaths.

Picture of Jennifer Biddle

In the space of eight months, five teenagers committed suicides by throwing themselves in front of trains in the California town of Palo Alto.

Picture of Laurie  Udesky

How do you tell the stories of children or teenagers who have stigmatizing health problems without causing harm once the story is published? Laurie Udesky offers tips for reporting with sensitivity — but still getting the story.

Picture of William Heisel

In 2002, when I was covering medicine for The Orange County Register, we produced a series of stories called "Doctors Without Discipline" that uncovered serious flaws in the way the Medical Board of California handled complaints from the public about physicians.

Picture of Sheraz Sadiq

I produced an eleven minute TV story on depression, focusing on new research into better understanding the neural mechanisms underlying depression, as well as current treatments, including antidepressants, transcranial magnetic stimulation and cognitive behavioral therapy, a form of talk therapy.

Picture of Sharon Salyer

The Laotian teenager was hearing voices saying that he needed to die. He wasn't sleeping or eating. He was losing weight. And he was convinced some force was trying to push him from a second-story window.

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The wave of attacks against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders has been emotionally gutting for these communities. In our next webinar, we’ll examine the impact of the crisis on the mental health of Asian Americans, especially the women who are often targeted. Join us for a deep discussion to inform your coverage of the crisis and broader reporting on AAPI communities. Sign-up here!

As public health officials like to say, "COVID-19 isn't done with us." And journalists know that we're not done with COVID-19. Apply now for five days of stimulating discussions on the pandemic's disproportionate impact on people of color -- plus reporting and engagement grants of $2k-$10k and five months of mentoring while you work on an ambitious project.

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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