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mental health

Picture of Claudia Boyd-Barrett
“Access varies quite dramatically depending on where you are,” said Kim Lewis of the National Health Law Program. “There isn’t a lot being done to ensure accountability in each county.”
Picture of Samantha Caiola
A lack of mental health professionals in rural counties is made worse by high rates of substance abuse, financial stress and isolation, which contribute to depression.
Picture of Michael Hill
Folks in underserved New Jersey face adversities that few in America ever even have to think about. How can the state turn the corner in addressing epidemic levels of trauma?
Picture of SJ Black
In 2017, Mendocino County voters voted for a special sales tax to improve mental health services. Is it making a difference yet?
Picture of Amanda Curcio
Hundreds of Arkansas children are thrown behind bars every year. Most haven’t committed a violent crime. Worse, the conditions they face in detention are abysmal.
Picture of Jayne O'Donnell
Exposure to domestic abuse can change how children view relationships, with effects that last a lifetime.
Picture of James  Causey
Boys from one of the country’s most beleaguered neighborhoods show up to work four hours and earn $20 and life skills. Most have already experienced multiple traumas in their young lives.
Picture of Claudia Boyd-Barrett
This article was produced as a project for the 2017 California Data Fellowship, a program of the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism.
Picture of Jonathan Bullington
This article was produced as a project for the Dennis A. Hunt Fund for Health Journalism, a program of the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism. 
Picture of Ed Williams
In states such as New Mexico, many kids are put into treatment foster care who should never be there. The programs, run by private companies, vary widely in quality and safety from state to state.

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The wave of attacks against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders has been emotionally gutting for these communities. In our next webinar, we’ll examine the impact of the crisis on the mental health of Asian Americans, especially the women who are often targeted. Join us for a deep discussion to inform your coverage of the crisis and broader reporting on AAPI communities. Sign-up here!

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