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mental illness

Picture of Deepa Bharath
Zuher Belal put a black pencil on the rectangular piece of paper stretched out on a table. The 21-year-old native of Syria drew a Muslim man with arms outstretched in prayer. Then, he drew an airplane dropping a bomb.
Picture of Elizabeth Zach
The technology isn’t a panacea for all that ails rural health care today. Some areas still lack the required internet connectivity, and critics say telemedicine doesn't enrich a local economy in the way a hospital does, providing jobs and other community goods.
Picture of Julie Small
Two reporters set out to answer a question: Was the horrific death of a mentally ill inmate in a California jail an anomaly or evidence of systemic deficiencies that could lead to more deaths?
Picture of Deepa Bharath
The shocking call came a decade ago from campus police at UC Berkeley. Kwang Ho Kim's son, a straight-A student, had dumped all his clothes on the bed and set them on fire.
Picture of Lisa Pickoff-White
There have been more than two dozen San Diego County jail suicides between 2010 and 2015, well above average. The suicides highlight a national problem: the increasing number of mentally ill people landing in jails.
Picture of Gisela Telis

Young people are suffering from mental health problems in unprecedented numbers — it's a problem that deserves a dedicated, thorough and sensitive investigation, says journalist Gisela Telis.

Picture of Lisa Pickoff-White

“We were really struck by the fact that people were incredibly acute in their need,” a disability rights attorney said after touring Sonoma County's main jail. “Higher than we’ve seen in units that are licensed designated hospital units. Something was wrong here.”

Picture of Lisa Pickoff-White

California’s jails were built to hold inmates for relatively short sentences — usually just a few months. But now local law enforcement is grappling with how to hold offenders for long periods of time, which is having an impact on mentally ill inmates.

Picture of Angela Naso

Mental illness has been a trending topic in the news. While we often see stories about it, not much attention is given to how the Latino community is faring. A 2016 California Fellow sets out to change that with a series on stigma and mental health needs in Southern California communities.

Picture of Deepa Bharath

In ethnic minority communities in particular, mental illness is a serious problem since stigma too often prevents individuals from seeking and getting the help they need. But a handful of programs are making progress in overcoming these obstacles.

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