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mental illness

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Documents behind a controversial Seroquel drug trial raise serious questions about how patients with mental disorders are judged competent to participate in clinical trials all over the world.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

How many people leave our prisons with no fixed destination?  If only for public safety reasons, you might assume the correctional system would want to know.  You would be wrong.

Picture of William Heisel

Dr. Carl Elliott, a University of Minnesota bioethicist, has spent much of the last two years doggedly pursuing the case of Dan Markingson, a 26-year-old who killed himself during a UM clinical trial meant to prove the superiority of AstraZeneca’s Seroquel over its competitors.

Picture of William Heisel

Dr. Carl Elliott is a brave man. A bioethicist with an MD, Elliott took on powerful interests at his own university on behalf of a woman he barely knew and a patient he could not save.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

As 2011 unfolds, I’d like to share some of my favorite health journalism – some but not all of it policy-related – from 2010. This is definitely not a best-of list, but rather journalism that can inspire and teach us.  Here are my first five picks, and below are my second five, in no particular order of importance. Do you have other recommendations for must-read health journalism from last year? Share it in the comments below.

Picture of Paul Kleyman

Serious depression is a growing problem for multicultural seniors. But unlike older whites, ethnic people 50-plus are blocked from treatment by poverty, limited or no insurance, lack of programs geared for them—and the stigma of mental problems that permeates many cultures. New America media senior editor Paul Kleyman begins his occasional series on mental challenges for ethnic seniors with this article on treatable depression.

Picture of Angilee Shah

Mental health professionals say that journalists need to get informed and be open to talking about how their work affects their mental health. This week at Career GPS, we get that conversation going.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

This is one in a series of articles examining the relationship between housing loss and death in San Francisco. Check out the previous articles in the series, Looking for death,Gunpowder on the streets, and Will losing your home kill you?

Picture of Victoria Colliver

Victoria Colliver explains that the effects of depression and mental illness have shown a high correlation to shortened life expectancy and links to high-risk health behaviors.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Here’s what we’re reading today:

Mental Illness: Is it becoming fashionable to be bipolar? British Medical Journal blogger Julian Sheather investigates.

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The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

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Nowhere was the massive COVID wave of winter 2021 more devastating than in America’s nursing homes, where 71,000 residents died in the surge. In this webinar, we’ll hear from the lead reporter in the USA Today series "Dying for Care," who will show how an original data analysis and an exhaustive reporting effort revealed a pattern of unnecessary deaths that compounded the pandemic’s brutal toll. Sign-up here!

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