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Mexico

Picture of Patricia Guadalupe

When most people think of Washington, D.C., the White House, the Washington Monument, the Smithsonian, and other tourist destinations usually come to mind. But Washington is also home to a growing number of Latino residents, including many Central Americans.

Picture of Susan  Abram

Outreach workers from health clinics have spent the last three years in search of 390,000 Los Angeles County residents who are uninsured and can qualify for free health insurance.

Picture of Kari Lydersen

Jose Arreola’s parents told him at age five that he couldn’t speak Spanish in public, and couldn’t tell anyone where the family was from, or his mom and dad could be taken away....

Picture of Jose Luis Buen Abad

Day laborers are informal, marginalized workers in high hazard industries with few legal protections. For my 2013 California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowship, project I will produce three related feature radio reports on the occupational health of day labor workers.

Picture of Amy DePaul

Good health is almost always associated with wealth and education, and yet low-income, newly arrived Latinos with neither of these are generally healthier than whites by a number of measures - what's known as the “Latino Health Paradox.” But within decades of their arrival, their health declines.

Picture of Martha Rosenberg

Faced with two mad cow scares this year, both US and Brazil authorities have debuted the concept of "atypical mad cow disease." Spontaneously-erupting mad cow that has no known cause and may be a genetic mutation has seldom if ever been reported before.

Picture of Kimber Solana

Sophia, 44, works up to 40 hours per week at a Mexican restaurant in Gurnee, Ill., making $10 an hour. With every paycheck, she said, $136 goes to payroll taxes, $62 of which goes to Social Security and Medicare. But as an undocumented immigrant, she will never receive those entitlements.

Picture of Rebecca Plevin

In Latino households, where family is a priority and multiple generations live under one roof, children face unique challenges in providing care for their aging relatives.

Picture of Ana Azpurua

 I will be reporting on three health issues that affect Latino families in North Texas, as part of my National Health Journalism Fellowship.

Picture of Allie  Hostler

Journalists Allie Hostler and Jacob Simas examine how people on the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation are dealing with rampant methamphetamine addiction.

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More than 100 anti-transgender rights bills were introduced in state legislatures this year. Many focus on children and teens. Join us for our next Health Matters webinar, where we'll explore the health and well-being of transgender youth as states such as Arkansas and Tennessee seek to limit their rights. Our expert panel will share the latest research, seed story ideas and offer reporting advice. Sign-up here!

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