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Why do Mexican-American schoolchildren in California have seven times more flame retardant in their systems than their peers in Mexico? Answers and more in our Daily Briefing.

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Why do two Central California cities top a new "most toxic" cities list? Plus more from our Daily Briefing.

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California scored in the lowest quartile among all states in its health care system's provision of services for children in a new Commonwealth Fund report, and the reasons behind it have very much to do with budget priorities. But there are also the complex issues of immigration and access to care that are not so easily resolved.

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A Commonwealth Fund survey compares the states on childrens' health care access and treatment, and California ranks in the bottom quartile.

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For many Mexican immigrants living in New York, working multiple jobs leaves little time for regular exercise. In addition, a heavy reliance on public transportation and a lack of rural areas means that physical activity is virtually nonexistent. Health experts cite this sedentary lifestyle as an emerging gateway to diabetes, especially among immigrants.

This story was originally published in Spanish. Below is the English translation.

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With limited access to affordable fruits, vegetables and other healthy foods, Mexicans living in New York are frequenting fast food restaurants instead of farmers' markets. The result is a spike in obesity and diabetes among this immigrant group.

This story was originally published in Spanish. Below is the English translation.

Part 3: In a sedentary country

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"It's the alcohol hangover," Gerardo Cuapio thought five years ago when he woke up thirsty and with blurred vision. National Health Journalism Fellow Pedro Frisneda tells the story of a man who was on the verge of death without knowing he had Type 2 diabetes. It's a cautionary tale for what happens to many Latin American immigrants who move to the United States, adopting a new lifestyle and diet that can contribute to developing the disease. "The Big Apple is confronting one of the worst diabetes epidemics in the nation and health authorities have declared it an emergency," with Hispanics suffering disproportionately.

This story was originally published in Spanish. Below is the English translation.

Part 2: In the kingdom of fats and sugar

Part 3: In a sedentary country

Picture of Pedro Frisneda

For many Mexican immigrants living in New York, working multiple jobs leaves little time for regular exercise. In addition, a heavy reliance on public transportation and a lack of rural areas means that physical activity is virtually nonexistent. Health experts cite this sedentary lifestyle as an emerging gateway to diabetes, especially among immigrants.

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OK. So, here's a confession.

Blogging scares me.

It's not that I can't write down my thoughts. Or that I can't will myself to the computer. It's just that blogs are right and left and crazy with opinions. We all have readers out there lerking in the shadows desperate for a sliver of a bias -- which we all have, but are loathe to admit --  and I hate to give them any ammunition.

Or is that just my readers?

LOL.

Anyway, here's me... writing a blog.

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Sandra McNeill has served as executive director of the Figueroa Corridor Community LandTrust since July 2007. Ms. McNeill returned to her home in the Figueroa Corridor in 2006 to work with the Land Trust after living in Oaxaca, Mexico. In 1995, she worked with other community activists to found Strategic Actions for a Just Economy (SAJE). Her years at SAJE included her role as the founding organizer of the Figueroa Corridor Coalition for Economic Justice.

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Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States?  Apply now for one of our positions. 

The best journalism these days wraps compelling narratives around scrupulous data analysis. Apply now for our 2021 Data Fellowship to learn the skills necessary to use big data to inform your reporting on health and social welfare issues. Learn more in this webinar on Aug. 3.

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