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Ed Martinez has over 30 years of healthcare management experience, including the administration of two acute care hospitals, two urban community health centers and one multi-specialty medical group. Mr. Martinez earned his master's in public health (hospital administration) from Yale University. He also received master's and bachelor's degrees in public administration from San Diego State University. In September 1998, Mr. Martinez joined the staff of San Ysidro Health Center (SYHC) as the organization's CEO.

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Dr. Bonnie Bade is a medical anthropologist whose work focuses on farm worker health, health care, California agriculture and farm labor, transnational migration, and ethnomedicine and ethnobotany among peoples of both indigenous Oaxaca and indigenous Southern California. Dr. Bade has worked with Mixtec communities in California, the San Diego/Tijuana border region, the San Joaquin Valley, and Oaxaca for over 15 years. Dr. Bade earned her Ph.D. in anthropology at the University of California, Riverside in 1994.

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Dr. Blanca Lomeli is the regional director of North America programs for Project Concern International, an outreach organization that works to prevent disease and provide access to clean water and nutritious food around the world. Lomeli has over 20 years of experience in the fields of community health and medicine. She has served as director of Project Concern's programs in Mexico for over 17 years, overseeing all operations and supervising staff in both Tijuana and Mexico City. She currently oversees a multi-million dollar project funded by the U.S.

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Dr. Alfonso Valenzuela Espinoza is chief of pathology at Hospital General de Tijuana in Tijuana, Mexico. He also is a commissioner for the United States-Mexico Border Health Commission, a binational organization working to optimize health and quality of life along the U.S.-Mexico border.

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Adela de la Torre, director and professor of the Chicana/o Studies Program, studies health care access and finance issues that affect the Latino community as well as border health issues. From 1996 to 2002, De la Torre was director of the Mexican American Studies and Research Center at the University of Arizona, where she developed and directed the Border Academy, a summer institute that explored issues unique to the U.S.-Mexico border. An economist, De la Torre is the author of "Sana, Sana: Mexican Americans and Health" and "Moving from the Margins: A Chicana's View of Public Policy."

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Native Americans experience higher disease rates than other Americans for problems ranging from diabetes and heart ailments to mental illness and suicides, which contribute to their lower life expectancy. Get tips from a veteran journalist for covering these health issues.

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