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Picture of Nalea J. Ko

It is three in the morning and Philip, 27, wakes up from a nightmare that he soon forgets. Vivid dreams and dizziness are recurring experiences, side effects he attributes to taking Atripla, a pill he consumes daily because he has AIDS.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Gastrointestinal deaths are on the rise in the United States, and norovirus and c. difficile are partly to blame.

Picture of Gergana Koleva

A confluence of factors including an inflexible regulatory enviroment that discourages research and discovery, a paltry research pipeline for drugs for the most serious illnesses, and a tendency for physicians to unnecessarily prescribe antibiotics for routine aches and pains is largely responsible for the rise of antibiotic-resistant infections in humans, speakers at a major conference on infectious diseases this week announced.

Picture of Gergana Koleva

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration will no longer consider withdrawing its approval for the routine use of penicillin and tetracyclines in food-producing animals, despite mounting evidence that traces of these drugs in retail meat reduce the effectiveness of antibiotics in humans, the agency quietly announced in the Federal Register the Thursday before Christmas.

Picture of Gergana Koleva

Three out of four Americans want government to do something to curb overuse of antibiotics on animal farms that supply most of the nation’s meat, and many believe the resulting rise of antibiotic-resistant superbugs is a serious threat to human health, Gergana Koleva reports.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

The impact of abortion on mental health, an end to some retiree health subsidies, and a postscript to the cantaloupe listeria outbreak, plus more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Nalea J. Ko

Issues surrounding sexuality can be a difficult topic for many people to openly discuss, but additional cultural barriers can make talking about subjects like HIV/AIDS almost impossible to broach.

Picture of William Heisel

Researchers are finally starting to answer the question of whether hospital scrubs can pose a danger to patients — and people on the subway.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

A major new report on vaccinen risks, Steve Jobs' prognosis, Rick Perry's health policies and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Linda Perez

The anti-immigrant sentiment that some Latinas in Georgia are experiencing has led some women to refrain from scheduling routine medical exams that could save their lives.

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