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In the coffee-growing highlands of Ethiopia, an Italian scientist on a plant collecting expedition discovers a local medicine man dispensing an apparent cure for AIDS. Fact or fiction?

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Someone at the Washington Post is having a very bad day today. As Gawker reports, a health story went live on the newspaper’s website with all of the editor’s comments in it. The story was quickly pulled down, but Gawker helpfully pasted the entire story on its site beforehand.

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Why is the controversial pesticide methyl iodide set to be used in California strawberry fields? Answers and more in our Daily Briefing.

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Why do two Central California cities top a new "most toxic" cities list? Plus more from our Daily Briefing.

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In July, I wrote about a “jaw-dropping” press release about California’s astonishing rise in whooping cough cases.

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While speaking at the National Institutes of Health on Tuesday, USAID Administrator Rajiv Shah (left, photo source USAID) told the audience of scientists how the development agency would support the creation of new innovations and their delivery to improve the health of the world’s neediest popul

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

The recent snowpocalypses around the country reminded me that if you haven’t taken a look at what the current flu season is like in your community, it’s a good time to do so. I like how the Miami Herald’s Fred Tasker set the scene for the 2010-2011 in this Q&A piece.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

As 2011 unfolds, I’d like to share some of my favorite health journalism – much but not all of it policy-related – from 2010. This is definitely not a best-of list, but rather journalism that can inspire and teach us.

Here are my first five picks, in no particular order of importance. I’ll share the next five next week.

Happy New Year!

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Andrew Wakefield — creator of one of the greatest scares in medical history — had many accomplices in misleading the world about a link between vaccines and autism. Many in the media helped him spread his intellectual poison. Celebrities rallied behind his fake cause. And the scientific community helped keep the hoax alive by citing his work as if it were legitimate.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

In our last briefing of 2010: a controversy over reporting on chronic Lyme disease. Happy holidays!

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