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Minnesota

Picture of William Heisel

Although Doctors Behaving Badly tends to focus on exactly what you would expect, its mission is to make people aware of the many ways that patients are left unprotected.

There are nearly 1 million licensed, practicing physicians nationwide. Antidote has no ability to count how many are “behaving badly,” but it is safe to say that only a slim minority are tainting the reputation of the medical community. Doctors who abuse, injure or kill patients are the surrogate markers for an illness in the physician discipline system. They are not the illness.

Picture of Angilee Shah

It's the kind of thing that makes traditionalists in journalism cringe, and convinces them that technology will ruin the integrity of news. SEO is the tech acronym for "search engine optimization," ways to design websites and content that will rank highly in search results. What many journalists might not realize is that the techniques of SEO are actually not that far off from the fundamentals of hard news.

Picture of Debra  Sherman

A new generation of heart devices is giving new hope to patients. Their use has increased 10-fold since January, but ethical quandaries loom: When is it appropriate to disconnect the device and let a patient die?

Picture of William Heisel

If you were going to make a bet on which doctor lost his license in Minnesota, who would you choose?

The doctor who didn’t pay his taxes?

The doctor who repeatedly had female patients undress in front of him, asked them to assume unusual positions while undressed and then touched their genitals without explaining why?

If you chose the tax laggard, you win. If you are a female patient in Minnesota, you may be losing.

Picture of Angilee Shah

As always, you can find job, internship, awards and fellowship opportunities at the end of this post.

Picture of May Yee Chen

May Yee Chen of the Minneapolis Star Tribune reports on how one hospital in Minnesota cut its C-section rate to 1 in 10 births by expanding the use of midwives.

Picture of Laurie  Udesky

Alameda County's path-breaking new mental-health court seeks to help youth with psychiatric problems who have broken the law.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

It sometimes seems like it takes a high-profile case like Terri Schiavo to get people to think about end-of-life issues – or editors to agree to stories on the topic.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Felice Freyer, veteran medical writer at the Providence Journal and Association of Health Care Journalists board member, is surveying reporters about how state and local agencies are releasing, or refusing to release, basic demographic information (not names) about people who have died from H1N1/swine flu.

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