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Missouri

Picture of Elizabeth Chuck
“Lights don’t feed kids,” one Democrat tweeted after the Governor’s Mansion was lit orange to raise awareness about hunger.
Picture of Elizabeth Chuck
An investigation found that Missouri was the only state to not allow grab-and-go meals, resulting in up to 97% fewer kids meals being distributed than last summer in some areas.
Picture of Elizabeth Chuck
"The narrative that we aren’t feeding kids who need help is just plain false," his communications director said after NBC News revealed Missouri was the only state not to opt in to grab-and-go meals.
Picture of Nancy  Cambria

A year after Michael Brown was killed by police in Ferguson, a reporter returned to the neighborhood and spent months talking with families about how they cope with toxic levels of stress and violence.

Picture of Edwin Bender

How much did the tobacco industry give to state candidates, committees, and ballot measures during the 2012 election cycle? 

Picture of Tammy Worth

Arguably the most unexpected aspect of the Supreme Court’s Affordable Care Act decision was its reversal of the mandatory expansion of Medicaid. Martha King of the National Conference of State Legislatures provides some tips on how to track this unfolding landscape.

Picture of Trudy  Lieberman

Republicans and their allies are dusting off an old $500 billion deception about Medicare, trying once more to scare seniors into voting their way. How some media are catching on — and supplying much-needed context.

Picture of Gergana Koleva

Hospitals across the country are using near-total discretion in the way they disclose infections that occur as a result of surgeries, cause over 8,000 deaths annually in the U.S., and cost an additional $10 billion per year to the healthcare system, a new study underscoring the need for public reporting standards has found.

Picture of Ken Reibel

Has autism always been with us at the numbers we see today, or is there actually more of it? It’s a complicated question, but the organization Autism Speaks is confusing the issue.

Picture of William Heisel

Kansas City Star reporter Alan Bavley was just doing his job. In response to his watchdog stories on medical malpractice, federal officials yanked public portions of a national doctor database offline and threatened him with fines. Now, journalists are pushing back.

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The nation’s overdose epidemic has entered a devastating new phase. Drugs laced with fentanyl and even more poisonous synthetics have flooded the streets, as the crisis spreads well beyond the rural, largely white communities that initially drew attention. The death rate is escalating twice as fast among Black people than among white people. This webinar will give journalists deep insights, fresh story ideas and practical tips for covering an epidemic that killed more than 107,000 people in the U.S. last year. Sign-up here!

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