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Missouri

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Recounting a tornado's path through Joplin's hospital, hospitals sanctioned in California, and seniors loading up on caffeinated energy drinks, plus more from our Daily Briefing.

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Journalist Lisa Jones muses on covering Native American health issues and remembers her friend Stanford Addison.

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The construction of a dam near an Indian reservation on the Missouri River forced residents to less fertile land and put an end to their farming habits. Since then, American Indians have experienced a lack of nutrition, leading to diabetes, hypertension and obesity.

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It makes for a sad spring when I can’t attend the annual Association of Health Care Journalists conference.

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Treatment centers such as Chad's Hope in Clay County aim to help get prescription drug addicts back on track. This story is part of a series that examines prescription drug abuse in Kentucky.

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Medicare’s new consumer information site, Physician Compare, promises the same gold mine of data patients find when they use Hospital Compare or Nursing Home Compare. But, unlike those sites, Physician Compare does not keep its promises.

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Last week, I started listing Antidote’s 10 favorite stories of the past year, in no particular order. Here is the rest of the list.

Dialysis: High Costs and Hidden Perils of a Treatment Guaranteed to All,” Robin Fields, ProPublica, November 2010

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This is part of my ongoing effort to highlight great investigative work being done outside Big Media.

Blythe Bernhard and Jeremy Kohler have been writing a series of stories in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch that should be carefully studied by anyone wanting to examine physician discipline in a state, region or nationally. Their latest installment, A felon, fit to practice? Disgraced doctor gets a second chance, started with straightforward top:

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Patrick Boyle is editor of Youth Today, the national trade newspaper and website for people who run youth programs, and a Huffington Post blogger who specializes in fatherhood. Mr. Boyle has covered youth issues for decades as a staff reporter on the Watertown Daily Times, The Washington Times and Youth Today and as a freelancer for the Washington Post, The Baltimore Sun, Newsday, Child and Parenting magazines and ABC News, among others. His 1994 book, “Scouts’ Honor,” examined child molestation in the Boy Scouts of America. Mr.

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Some West Virginia lawmakers want to ban K2 and other so-called synthetic marijuana products, which are growing in popularity.

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The pandemic has thrown into brutal relief the extent to which the U.S. health care system produces worse outcomes for patients of color. And yet there has been scant focus on one of the biggest drivers of structural racism in health care: How doctors and hospitals are paid. In this webinar, we’ll highlight the ways in which the health care system’s focus on money and good grades is shortchanging the health of communities of color. Sign-up here!

U.S. children and teens have struggled with increasing rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior for much of the past decade. Join us as we explore the systemic causes and policy failures that have accelerated the crisis and its inequitable impact, as well as promising community-driven approaches and evidence-based practices. The webinar will provide fresh ideas for reporting on the mental health of youth and investigating the systems and services. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors and a social media consultant to join its team. Learn more about the positions and apply.

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