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Health investigators at Drexel University want medical centers to start asking patients what kind of work they do.

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California sits atop an enormous shale deposit, raising the prospect of significant fracking activity. State regulators and lawmakers are looking to adopt new regulations. How much financial muscle is the oil and natural gas industry flexing in the decision being made about fracking in California?

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How much did the tobacco industry give to state candidates, committees, and ballot measures during the 2012 election cycle? 

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California’s so-called “Human Right to Water package” is a group of bills that would expand efforts to improve water quality in California. Who's behind the lobbying for these bills, and what money is involved?

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You can’t inoculate health care policy against the ills of politics. You can, however, evaluate the money-in-politics angle.

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Last week in Career GPS, the ReportingonHealth community shared its best health media in 2010. This week, we're highlighting awards to celebrate that work.

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Clinical psychologist William Fals-Stewart should have quit while he was ahead.

While studying drug use at the University of Buffalo Research Institute on Addictions, Fals-Stewart was accused in 2004 of faking his data in reports to the federal government. In one case, he said he had studied more than 200 subjects, yet he only had consent forms for about 50.

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Follow the money. That simple phrase – though never uttered by Bob Woodward’s most famous source – has propelled countless reporters to dig deeply into all manner of news stories.

And nearly four decades after Woodward and Carl B

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It's a common complaint among police officers. In the wake of television shows like CSI, the public expects too much. They think that cops can lift a 30-year-old fingerprint off a Pabst Blue Ribbon bottle found at the bottom of a lake just by running it through the portable 30-PBR-H2O scanner the CSI team members carry in their Thermoses.

That type of technology just doesn't exist, police are fond of saying. And even some of the high-tech stuff that does exist is only accessible by the elite officers of the major metropolitan departments and the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

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Dr. Wei Yu is a professor at Shanghai University of Finance and Economics School of Public Economics and Administration. He also serves as director for the school's Center for Health Policy and Administration. Wei also is a fellow with the Center for Health Policy (CHP) and the Center for Primary Care and Outcomes Research (PCOR) at Stanford University. He is a former health economist at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System.  He conducts economic analysis in healthcare studies for national VA healthcare research programs.

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