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native american

Picture of Sarah Gustavus
Chronic illnesses, particularly diabetes, are a longstanding public health concern in many tribal communities in the Southwest. Sarah Gustavus and Antonia Gonzales examine how some individuals have overcome those challenges and are now sharing information and resources.
Picture of Samuel White Swan-Perkins
In reviewing the series that I wrote for the USC Annenberg School of Journalism School of Health Journalism, it is critical to remember that it was penned during a very different political climate than the one we are currently facing in the United States. When the piece began, the Obama administrati
Picture of Samuel White Swan-Perkins
This article was produced as a project for the USC Center for Health Journalism’s California Fellowship.
Picture of Ryan Burns

This story was produced as a project for the California Health Journalism Fellowship, a program of the Center for Health Journalism at the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.

Picture of Ryan Burns

The Yurok, California’s largest Native American tribe, recently submitted an emergency declaration to Gov. Jerry Brown and the federal government in response to a rash of suicides among the tribe’s young men. What's driving this trend, and what can be done?

Picture of Emily  Cureton

Even though people in California's Del Norte County have been reporting domestic violence at a staggering rate, most abuse is suffered in secrecy. That can make it easy to overlook the fact that Native American communities are disproportionately affected.

Picture of Bob  Ortega

Roughly four out of five parents don't install car seats correctly, and the results can be disastrous. A new investigative series by The Arizona Republic finds that Hispanic and Native American children were from two times to as much as 10 times likelier not to be properly restrained.

Picture of Mary Pember

American Indians represent the “gold standard” for bad health in this country. We top the lists for mental health related illnesses like addiction and suicide.  American Indian women also suffer the highest rates of sexual assault of any U. S. ethnicity.

Picture of Joaqlin Estus

Using a bucket as a toilet, hauling water or chopping ice to melt for daily use are daily facts of life for thousands of Alaska natives. Meanwhile, the state is flush with cash, prompting the question of why such conditions persist.

Picture of Stephanie Woodard

The emergency room doctor was furious at the abuse heaped on Audre’y Eby's son. The boy's injuries would soon lead to an arrest warrant for the mother—not because she had caused the harm, but because she did not return her son, along with his wheelchair-bound twin, to their abusers.

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