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Native Americans

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Desperate to stem the recent spate of youth suicides in their community, residents of South Dakota's Pine Ridge Indian Reservation have turned to an unlikely ally — crowdfunding.

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Local programs within Native American communities are at the forefront of an effort to increase cancer screening and reduce cancer deaths.

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Montana Native Americans have the highest rate of suicide in a state that has the highest rate in the nation. Tribal Leaders are not taking these deaths lightly, and the fight against suicide has begun.

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Stephanie Woodward reports on how The Cheyenne River Youth Project (CRYP) has started to take steps towards healthier, diabetes-free youth, with informational video and media materials.

Picture of Cindy Uken

Montana is a vast, frontier state with many small towns scattered in rural counties. A few of those counties don’t have a single doctor or even a pharmacy. For Montanans suffering with mental health issues, those distances can be especially devastating.

Picture of Bill Graves

Candida KingBird, 38, has lived a decade with diabetes and has five children, the last of whom nearly died from problems related to the disease after a cesarean section. Read about her journey through a difficulty, risky sixth pregnancy.

Picture of Bill Graves

Native Americans have the highest diabetes rate among all racial and ethnic groups in America and offer a preview of where the rest of the country is headed. They also have found ways to keep the disease at bay. 

Picture of Bill Graves

Candida King Bird, 38, the diabetic pregnant mother featured in The Oregonian earlier this month, delivered a healthy 9-pound, 12-ounce girl on Thursday.

Picture of Bill Graves

By most measures, Native Americans' health problems exceed the average, and it's even worse for urban Indians who can't tap social and health services available on distant reservations. The problem's not new, but some of the solutions are.

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The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

Let us support your next ambitious health reporting project through our National Fellowship program. Apply today.

Nowhere was the massive COVID wave of winter 2021 more devastating than in America’s nursing homes, where 71,000 residents died in the surge. In this webinar, we’ll hear from the lead reporter in the USA Today series "Dying for Care," who will show how an original data analysis and an exhaustive reporting effort revealed a pattern of unnecessary deaths that compounded the pandemic’s brutal toll. Sign-up here!

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