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Natural Disaster

Picture of Angilee Shah

It might cause a snicker or two from many Angelenos, but last week, I took a tour of the Los Angeles River.

Picture of Kate  Benson

Do death threats to an isolated few make for good journalism or just sensationalism? And in pursuing the unusual do journalists run the risk of skewing the overall situation? Does having one source on each side of the issue really provide accurate balance and meaningful context? Questions are easy, answers are harder.

Picture of Angilee Shah

It was an eventful weekend in the news. Today's Daily Briefing will help you catch up on health in the debt deal, learn surprising facts about clinical trials abroad and violence in hospitals, and connect with tough-but-important stories about famine and homelessness.

Picture of Emily Ramshaw

Nearly half a million Texans live in substandard conditions in colonias -- 2,300 unincorporated and isolated border towns with limited access to potable water, sewer systems, electricity, sanitary housing or health care. Emily Ramshaw reports on their health conditions.

 

Picture of Linda Marsa

At what point will our planet become too darn hot? Scientists are now saying that if we don't do anything about curbing carbon emissions, temperatures in the next few decades could rise so high so fast that many regions of the Earth will become inhabitable.

Picture of Kelley Atherton

Between March and May, I had several moments of panic about whether I was going to be able to complete the last two of the three stories I promised for the fellowship.There's a sense of relief when the editing is done and the designers are putting it on the page and I go home to try and take my mind off the story. That usually doesn't work and I ended up laying in bed worrying about typos, whether names are spelled correctly or huge inaccuracies because I've completely misunderstood the story (that has never happened, but I still worry nonetheless) and that I'm a fraud of a journalist. The real sigh of relief comes the next day when I'm thinking about the next story.

Picture of Angilee Shah

Global health journalist Sam Loewenberg is passionate about his work. But if you really want to get a rise out of him, ask him to talk about how media organizations treat freelance journalists trying to do serious journalism.  

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Recounting a tornado's path through Joplin's hospital, hospitals sanctioned in California, and seniors loading up on caffeinated energy drinks, plus more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Lisa Jones

Journalist Lisa Jones muses on covering Native American health issues and remembers her friend Stanford Addison.

Picture of Beatrice Motamedi

Interviews with and writings by nearly 100 students at the Castlemont Campus of Small Schools reveal three major stressors jeopardize their health: academic anxiety, lack of healthy food and an environment that limits their freedom and imprisons them indoors. Even more alarming, factors such as a poor diet and lack of nutrition can lead to health problems that can be passed on to future generations, researchers say.

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