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Natural Disaster

Picture of Mark Taylor

This story is Part 12 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

John Grimm knows the city of Gary faces severe financial problems and didn’t expect city crews to plow all of its streets overnight after the recent blizzard.

But Grimm, the executive director of the South Shore Health & Rehabilitation Center in Gary, said during and after the storm city leaders failed to protect some of Gary’s most vulnerable residents when its crews neglected to plow the alleys and streets surrounding the nursing home.

Grimm said for an entire week the streets around the long-term care facility were not plowed, which he said “put the lives of many residents in jeopardy, as ambulances and emergency medical services and other medical providers were not able to access the facility.”

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Here’s the latest in health and health journalism news from Reporting on Health. Our hearts also go out to the people of Japan after today’s catastrophic earthquake – here’s how to help the victims.

Picture of Francine Kaufman, M.D.

The public hospital in Port-au-Prince is the most under-resourced, filthy, overwhelmed health care facility we have ever seen. We’ve seen patients with Meningitis, diarrhea, infections. When I tried to help three kids with diabetes, there was not even a glucose meter to be found in the hospital. All this makes it near to impossible to help people.

Picture of Kari Lydersen

Carbon dioxide gets most of the public attention as the main driver of climate change, a serious and increasing threat to public health worldwide.
But “black carbon” or “soot” emitted from diesel engines, cook stoves, brick kilns, agricultural burning and other sources in the developing and developed world poses a serious health risk for people especially in south and east Asia.

Picture of Linda Marsa

Think floods like the ones in Pakistan and Australia can't happen in California?  Think again, say government researchers.

Picture of Heather May

In a state that prides itself as one of the healthiest in the nation, the people of western Salt Lake City face geographic health disparities that are daunting to overcome, including higher pollution and asthma rates.

Picture of Pauline Bartolone

California's Central Valley grows fruits and vegetables for the whole country, employing farm workers to care for and harvest the produce. But the recession and drought conditions have forced farm workers out of work, and now many of them are in need of food aid.

Picture of William Heisel

Medical boards all across the country let doctors get away with fakery on their resumes.

But not South Dakota.

Picture of Nalea J. Ko

The sun rose over the horizon a few hours before 62-year-old Sung Nguyen stood dockside with tears steadily flowing down his cheeks. The new day brought the same stress of being out of work with few prospects. The Vietnamese American fisherman watched his nearby docked boat, wrapped partially in "Dream Girls" movie posters, as it rocked gently in a Biloxi, Mississippi harbor.

Picture of Stephan  Faris

When it comes to climate change, the most important impacts of the emissions from our cars, power plants and factories are likely to be broad and indirect. Global warming needs to be examined not just from the perspective of medicine, but from public health.

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