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Nevada

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Instability and sharp premium increases are roiling health exchanges across the country. As insurers submit their rate requests, here's what our expert panel said reporters should bear in mind.
Picture of Jackie Valley

Parents. Teachers. Psychologists. Psychiatrists. Pediatricians. Therapists. Social workers. Students. State leaders. Nonprofit executives. They had come to discuss the mental health of Southern Nevada’s children, seeking answers to the question of how the state can do better.

Picture of Jackie Valley

Three cases down and a dozen more to go, Judge William Voy surveys the movement below his bench on a Monday afternoon. The fourth defendant on his calendar, a 13-year-old boy, enters from a side door connecting Family Court to the juvenile detention center. He’s no stranger to Courtroom 18.

Picture of Jackie Valley

Southern Nevada often struggles to care for children with mental health challenges. A common complaint is that Las Vegas’ mental health care system is too fragmented to care for its children successfully. “As parents, we are often faced with unfriendly systems,” one parent said at a recent forum.

Picture of Sierra Crane-Murdoch

In a small Nevada town once plagued by childhood cancer, families still search for answers to what caused the cluster of cases. Some suspected environmental causes, but so little is still understood about pollutants and cancer.

Picture of Karla Escamilla

Why family members and schools should be paying attention to indicators of mental health problems in teenagers and their potential links to violent behavior.

Picture of Sierra Crane-Murdoch

The site of the most significant childhood cancer cluster on national record can shed light on why epidemiology and other scientific inquiries into environmental health problems rarely secure regulatory change or care for those impacted.

Picture of James Salwitz

The medical equivalents of U-Haul, Home Depot and rental rug shampooers, self service operating rooms have been the subject of debate and excitement.

Picture of The Reporting on Health Collaborative

The number of valley fever cases has soared so high in recent years that health experts are calling it "The Second Epidemic."
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now confirms a sharp rise in cases of the fungal disease, especially in California and Arizona.

Picture of William Heisel

With Justin Bieber ticketed for dodging paparazzi and Katie Holmes awarded primary custody, the gossip press can be forgiven for missing the latest in the case of the doctor who overdosed Michael Jackson.

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