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Nevada

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With no licensing or certification, anyone can practice in-home elder care in California—and in wealthy Marin, opportunity for fraud abounds.

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While many states make information related to medical care complications public, Oregon does not. That means that the best information about an individual hospital’s quality and safety may be kept from the public.

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The Medical Board of California finally has filed a petition to revoke Dr. Conrad Murray’s medical license, nearly three years after Michael Jackson died after taking anesthesia drugs Murray gave him. So what took so long?

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Californians are required to disclose the radon level in their home, if known, before transferring it to a new owner. Nevadans are not. In both states, renters are particularly vulnerable. "There are no regulations to protect renters from radon in Nevada," said Susan Howe, radon education program director for the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension. "There are no regulations dealing with radon in Nevada, period. There are no laws to protect people when they buy or build homes."

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When investigative health journalist Marshall Allen told me that my anti-FOIA stance seemed counterproductive, I listened. Here's his compelling argument.

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Every time Public Citizen ranks state medical boards for their effectiveness, some official will say that it is an unfair assessment because state boards all work differently in overseeing doctors. This is partly true — and it is also part of the problem.

 

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States cut back on HIV/AIDS drugs for the poor, Nevada's smoking ban lowers heart attacks and stroke, and a Medicaid success story, plus more in our Daily Briefing.

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Fined by the Nevada medical board and ordered to stop performing abortions, Dr. Algis Martell had a decision to make.

As so many doctors do when they make a mess of their primary specialty, Martell decided to get a makeover.

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Dr. Algis Martell found a unique solution to the abortion debate.

According to the Nevada Board of Medical Examiners, he performed abortions on women who were never pregnant and, when they were pregnant, he said he was performing an abortion but did not.

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