Skip to main content.

New York City,New York,United States

Picture of William Heisel

There are several ways to secure one’s genetic line for at least another generation.

One can court another person, marry (or not), mate and bask in the many joys of parenthood.

Folks born without the proper equipment or in relationships that don’t allow for simple reproduction can arrange for an egg donor, sperm donor or surrogate mother to help carry one’s genes to a daughter or a son. Parenthood is just as fun.

And then there is what someday may be dubbed the Ramaley method.

Picture of William Heisel

If the ProPublica experiment with nonprofit investigative journalism is teaching us anything, it is the importance of follow-through.

Picture of Angilee Shah

Health care reform, and the ideological, political and public health battles that surrounded it, reached a fever pitch in the media by the time the legislation reached the House of Representatives in March. Many members of ReportingonHealth were watching and chronicling these events closely. Here, a cross-section of reporters discusses their experience working on these complex stories.

Picture of Sarah Kramer

In order to serve its increasingly multi-lingual population, New York State requires interpretation services in all hospitals. But when caring for immigrants, the language barrier is just one of a myriad of issues health providers grapple with. Even though there is no statewide mandate for cultural sensitivity, many doctors say it's become a necessary instrument in providing medical care for the city's immigrant population.

Picture of Sarah Kramer

One out of four New Yorkers doesn't speak or understand complex sentences in English. But at some point in their lives, every one of them will need to see a doctor. Language barriers can result in misdiagnoses, medication errors, and potentially fatal mistakes that are costly for both patients and providers. For this reason, hospitals in New York are required to provide "meaningful language access" to all patients. But in a city where more than 140 different languages are spoken, this is no easy task.

Picture of Rong  Xiaoqing

My Dennis Hunt grant story, No Racial Boundary for HIV, was published in Sing Tao Daily on the World AIDS Day in 2009. It was the only feature story published in any publications in New York, if not in the nation, that focused on the AIDS/HIV issue in the Asian community.

Picture of Victor Merina

While a weekend snowstorm raged in Washington, D.C., a small group of health care advocates gathered in a conference room at the Hyatt Regency Hotel and were treated to a history lesson as well as a glimpse into the cold realities of Indian Country.

The topic: American Indian Health Policy. And unlike the weather that everyone talks about, a trio of speakers addressed a subject they insist is largely overlooked.

Picture of Adriana Venegas-Chavez

Part 1: Innovative ways are sought to get patients to follow their treatment 

Picture of Bernice Yeung

This piece -- part of my Prisons & Public Health news blog -- ran on Newsdesk.org as part of my ongoing exploration of the connection between prisoner reentry, public health and public safety.

Pages

Announcements

Our California Fellowship supports reporters in the Golden State pursuing ambitious projects on overlooked health and health equity issues.

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth