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New York Times

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
“The bottom line is really that loneliness and isolation are bad for our health,” said UCSF geriatrician Dr. Carla Perissinotto.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Workers are being forced to choose between unemployment or returning to work and risking their family's health.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Pam Belluck of The New York Times and expert Dr. Roberta DeBiasi offer fresh insights on the novel syndrome.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
As the amount of COVID-19 data grows, so do the coverage possibilities for reporters covering the pandemic.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
NYT's Katie Thomas shares how she finds and vets stories of real people stung by ever-rising drug prices, and expert panelists provide key context for rounding out coverage.
Picture of William Heisel

GlaxoSmithKline, the largest drug company in Britain and one of the largest in the world, has made an industry first move.

Picture of Ryan White

The language gap between rich and poor children may be well known but new research suggests the gap may be taking shape earlier than anyone expected.

Picture of Kate  Benson

A few weeks ago Slate writer Brian Palmer accused New York Times writer Jane Brody of using a red herring for a lede and promoting a theory that he believes is not factually substantiated. But, did he then do the same?

Picture of William Heisel

When in doubt, call it heart disease. This seems to be the mantra of many in medicine, unfortunately, according to a recent study in Preventing Chronic Disease. The study found evidence that heart disease is too frequently reported as a cause of death when other causes are more likely culprits.

Picture of Martha Rosenberg

 Marketed to men, testosterone is supposed to be a way to stay young and virile. Marketed to women, it is supposed to be a way to recapture waning sexual desire and boost the libido.

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Domestic violence affects tens of millions of Americans every year. Yet media outlets mostly treat incidents as "cops" items, if they cover them at all, as opposed to treating domestic violence as a public health problem. Our free two-day symposium will help journalists understand the root causes and promising prevention, intervention and treatment approaches.  Plus participants will be able to apply for grants to report California-focused projects.

The pandemic has unleashed a tsunami of misinformation, lies and half-truths capable of proliferating faster than the virus itself. In our next webinar, we’ll delve into what one of our speakers has termed “the natural ecology of bullshit” — how to spot it, how it spreads, who is most impacted, and how to counter it. And we’ll discuss reporting examples, strategies and story ideas that incorporate these insights and effectively communicate to diverse audiences. Sign-up here!

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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