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Should pizza be restricted to "save us from ourselves?" Answers and more in our Daily Briefing.

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In an effort to promote awareness of the relationship between healthy forests, healthy people and healthy economies, The UN has declared 2011 the International Year of Forests. One overlooked reality links healthy forests, healthy people and improved global sanitation: the production and use of toilet paper, from forest to flush.

 

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When I began reporting on health taboos in Asian communities in New York, I didn't know I would be facing such tough challenges.

 

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For many Mexican immigrants living in New York, working multiple jobs leaves little time for regular exercise. In addition, a heavy reliance on public transportation and a lack of rural areas means that physical activity is virtually nonexistent. Health experts cite this sedentary lifestyle as an emerging gateway to diabetes, especially among immigrants.

This story was originally published in Spanish. Below is the English translation.

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With limited access to affordable fruits, vegetables and other healthy foods, Mexicans living in New York are frequenting fast food restaurants instead of farmers' markets. The result is a spike in obesity and diabetes among this immigrant group.

This story was originally published in Spanish. Below is the English translation.

Part 3: In a sedentary country

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"It's the alcohol hangover," Gerardo Cuapio thought five years ago when he woke up thirsty and with blurred vision. National Health Journalism Fellow Pedro Frisneda tells the story of a man who was on the verge of death without knowing he had Type 2 diabetes. It's a cautionary tale for what happens to many Latin American immigrants who move to the United States, adopting a new lifestyle and diet that can contribute to developing the disease. "The Big Apple is confronting one of the worst diabetes epidemics in the nation and health authorities have declared it an emergency," with Hispanics suffering disproportionately.

This story was originally published in Spanish. Below is the English translation.

Part 2: In the kingdom of fats and sugar

Part 3: In a sedentary country

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When we think about how to get eyeballs on our reporting these days, we talk a lot about Twitter and Facebook and online branding. Tracy Weber, senior reporter at ProPublica, took California Health Journalism Fellows back to the basics of getting and keeping readers: great writing.

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When I was selected to be part of The California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowship program back in June 2010, I had three story ideas I wanted to develop for my fellowship projects. They involved three major health problems affecting the Latino community in the United States: health disparities of Latino women, diabetes and obesity among Mexican immigrants and Latinos affected by HIV/AIDS.

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