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Nursing Homes

Picture of Jared Whitlock
COVID-19 testing varies widely across San Diego senior facilities. The state and county aim to induce widespread testing in senior homes, but advocates say these efforts are moving too slowly and lack teeth.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Influential epidemiologist Michael Osterholm and New York Times reporter Apoorva Mandavilli offer an unvarnished view of what testing can do right now.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
As the amount of COVID-19 data grows, so do the coverage possibilities for reporters covering the pandemic.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
The pile-up of nursing home deaths­ from COVID-19 has seared the vulnerabilities of America’s nursing homes in the public conscience as nothing else has.
Picture of Jared Whitlock
The assisted living industry has largely resisted calls for federal oversight, saying greater regulatory and staffing expenses would be passed on to residents.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
Reporters file the same stories about bad nursing homes year after year. Little changes. But what if we did more to help families find the right facilities in the first place?
Picture of Emily Underwood
Poor people, people in isolated, rural areas and minorities are least likely to receive palliative care and counseling about end-of-life decisions. And one-third of U.S. hospitals don’t have a palliative care team.
Picture of Ryan White

An innovative program allows elderly residents to remain in their own homes, rather than in a nursing home. At AltaMed's El Monte clinic, a 14-member interdisciplinary team coordinates each senior patient’s care, and vulnerable seniors are kept as busy and engaged as possible.

Picture of William Heisel

A recent Sac Bee investigation revealed disturbingly high staff turnover rates at a number of California nursing homes. You can discover similar trends by learning how to navigate the data in California’s Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development and similar agencies nationwide.

Picture of Michael Berens

Minimally-regulated residential care for the elderly is a fast growing, less expensive alternative to nursing homes. Seattle Times investigative reporter Mike Berens explains how state agencies saved money by placing poor and vulnerable adults in these facilities, then ignored problems, like abuse.

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