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nutrition

Picture of Elizabeth Varin

Theoretically, Imperial Valley should be one of the healthiest areas of the nation if you look at food production. With a more than $1 billion agriculture industry growing almost anything under the sun, including artichokes, bamboo shoots, citrus, hay, leafy greens, broccoli, cauliflower, and more than 100 other types of crops, residents should have a nearly unlimited supply of fresh fruit, vegetables and meat, leading to a health community.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

"Appetite for Profit" author Michele Simon unpacks what journalists got right — and wrong — about this week's school lunch nutritition controversy, and how to add more context to your reporting on the issue.

Picture of Molly Gray

"Food deserts" — geographic areas that don’t have access to fresh, affordable, healthy food, such as fruits and vegetables — are often covered from an angle that reports simply on the fact that produce is lacking. But there are plenty of angles to take when tackling this tough subject. Here are just a few.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Tomato paste a "vegetable" in school lunches, high lead levels in New Orleans homes, and suing medical marijuana outlets, plus more from our Daily Briefing. 

Picture of Elizabeth Baier

Walk into the kitchen of Eugenia Delgado's home in Faribault, and you'll see a dinnertime battle about to play out. When Delgado insists that her son eat some vegetables, he tells her he doesn't want broccoli.

Picture of Caitlin Buysse (Kandil)

Diet of fruits and vegetables is ultimately cheaper, but Bostonians are hooked on fast, convenient food

Picture of Katharine Mieszkowski

California kids are slightly less likely to be overweight than they were five years ago.

Picture of William Heisel

Can eating too many desserts cause diabetes? Yes. Is a Burger King advertising campaign to blame? That’s a tougher call, one that few reporters have tried to answer.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Good news for conjoined twins, millions spent on health reform lobbying and literally addictive junk food, plus more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Eddie North-Hager

While obesity is a problem for Americans in all walks of life, it’s worse when you don’t live near a park, when access to public transportation is limited, when sidewalks are broken and streetlights are few. In fact, a National Institutes of Health study found that just living in a socioeconomically deprived area leads to weight gain and a greater risk of dying at an early age. In stark terms, people in Culver City live an average of eight years longer than people in Jefferson Park, according to Crump. Yet these two communities in the middle of Los Angeles are only a couple of miles apart.

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