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nutrition

Picture of Kate Long

In West Virginia, some grocery stores are removing the junk food displays near checkout lines and replacing them with fresh and dried fruit, granola bars and other healthy snacks. But will that encourage shoppers to make healthier food choices?

Picture of Maria Gaura

An estimated 20 percent of all field crops grown on California’s Central Coast are left in the field or thrown out at the packing shed. Volunteers for a farmer-run non-profit in Santa Cruz salvage the surplus and send them to local food banks.

Picture of Shelley Levitt

Not everyone has easy access to fresh fruits and vegetables. Three women across the country are doing something about it.

Picture of Maria Gaura

Farmers in Santa Cruz, Monterey and San Benito counties donate thousands of tons of fresh fruits and vegetables to food banks every year, supply feeding centers as far away as Washington and Colorado. It’s a massive foodlift operation that all began 38 years ago with a freezer full of slightly yellow cauliflower.

Picture of Tara  Leonard

As the staff and volunteers at Second Harvest Food Bank work to combine food distribution with community-based nutrition education, the obvious questions arise: Do these peer education programs actually make a difference? Do participants change their eating habits for the better? And do these behavioral changes create measurable differences in participants' health?

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Children's hospitals and McDonald's, a new home for MRSA, measles on the rise and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Tara  Leonard

By combining fresh fruit and vegetable delivery with health education, Second Harvest is empowering food bank members to become active participants in their community’s nutrition education. Second Harvest has transformed itself from a “food bank” to a “nutrition bank,” creating the community organizers of tomorrow.

Picture of Maria Gaura

When California’s first food bank opened in this Central Coast city in 1972, its mission was simple and practical: eliminate hunger by collecting society’s surplus food and giving it to people in need. But over the years, the mix of donated foods has changed dramatically. Here's why.

Picture of Kate Long

A formerly sickly child, West Virginia's top health official finds himself in the position to affect the health of more than 400,000 West Virginians enrolled in Medicaid, DHHR's biggest program.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

No whooping cough booster shot, no school, Medicaid woes and more from our Daily Briefing.

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