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Obamacare

Picture of Ida Mojadad
Has San Francisco's pre-Obamacare safety net plan been superseded by history?
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Medicare for All “has changed the dialogue about where we could go as a country,” said Joanne Kenen, Politico's executive health care editor.
Picture of Ryan White
“For supporters of the ACA, we dodged a bullet,” said UCLA's Gerald Kominski. “However, just because the Dems won the House does not mean the ACA is safe at all.”
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
Did the media learn anything from covering previous rounds of health reform during the Clinton and Obama eras? You wouldn't necessarily think so from reading recent coverage, argues Trudy Lieberman.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
You don't see many stories about people stuck in the "family glitch" or who have fallen in the "coverage gap." But millions remain left out of the ACA's thwarted dream of universal coverage — and their stories matter.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
"I’ve always believed that the continuing fight over the law was a tactic used by conservatives to push the country’s thinking about health insurance much further to the right."
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
The election breakthroughs in states such as Nebraska, Utah and Idaho suggest the national conversation on universal coverage is changing.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
Protecting sick people is a hot issue on the midterm campaign trail, a barometer of how attitudes about health insurance have shifted over the past decade.
Picture of Paul Demko
An Idaho native helping to lead the effort to bring more health care to lower-income residents gave a blunt assessment: “It’s a tragedy if we lose,” he said. “If we win, we make history.”
Picture of Paul Demko
She is ‘still defending that vote’ to repeal the health law, says her Democratic rival for Congress.

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