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Obamacare

Picture of Lisa   Bernard-Kuhn

Rachel Hill has her diabetes under control after two years of not having insurance. Larry Keller is cancer free after a life-saving surgery, made possible by new insurance coverage. But a glut of new consumers now covered by Medicaid are waiting as much as four months before seeing a doctor.

Picture of Soumya Karlamangla

Even after Obamacare, millions of people still don't have health coverage in California. How are these remaining uninsured going to be taken care of? That question has yet to be answered, but the debate around the issue -- which is tricky politically and financially -- is bound to be contentious.

Picture of Tracy  Seipel

One year into the explosive, health law-induced growth of Medi-Cal, it appears one of the most alarming predictions of critics is coming true: The supply of doctors hasn't kept up with demand.

Picture of Kathleen O'Brien

New Jersey's health care safety net for poor families was strained even before the ACA offered states money to expand Medicaid. The rate it pays doctors is among the lowest of any state in the nation. That can make it hard for patients to get the timely care they need.

Picture of SE Ruckman

Despite living in a state where Medicaid was not expanded, Oklahoma’s 38 federally recognized tribes have found a way to state tribal liaison Sally Carter. And she has found her way to them.

Picture of Timothy  Darragh

A strongly reported series examining a new program targeting 'super-utilizers' in Pennsylvania debunks a number of myths about the system's sickest and most vulnerable patients. Timothy Darragh tells the story behind the story and the lessons he learned along the way.

Picture of Lisa Morehouse

Despite the Affordable Care Act, there are still millions of Californians without health insurance. Undocumented immigrants don’t qualify for Obamacare benefits, while many others find coverage still too expensive or face other obstacles in enrolling.

Picture of Erica Mu

Obamacare's enrollment period largely overlaps with the holidays, when potential enrollees' budgets and mental resources are stretched. So why not schedule enrollment season after the holidays, when tax refunds could give low-income consumers an extra nudge?

Picture of Jennifer Haberkorn

North Carolina signed up more enrollees in Obamacare than any other red state. Yet politically, the legislation remains a huge liability for Democrats in the state. That's partly a result of enrollment organizers' attempt to keep insurance sign-ups as separate from the issue's politics as possible.

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