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Obamacare

Picture of Lisa   Bernard-Kuhn

In Southwest Ohio and Northern Kentucky, more than 85,600 residents have enrolled into the new Medicaid benefits in the last year. The expansion has been a boon for community health centers and safety net providers that for decades have discounted care or forgone payments from uninsured patients.

Picture of Lisa   Bernard-Kuhn

Larry Keller doesn’t mince words when it comes to how he feels about the country’s health law. “A typical Cincinnati conservative would rather slit his wrists than consider a so-called Obamacare policy," he said. "But no exaggeration, I wouldn't be here if it weren't for the Healthcare.gov website."

Picture of Lisa   Bernard-Kuhn

Rachel Hill has her diabetes under control after two years of not having insurance. Larry Keller is cancer free after a life-saving surgery, made possible by new insurance coverage. But a glut of new consumers now covered by Medicaid are waiting as much as four months before seeing a doctor.

Picture of Soumya Karlamangla

Even after Obamacare, millions of people still don't have health coverage in California. How are these remaining uninsured going to be taken care of? That question has yet to be answered, but the debate around the issue -- which is tricky politically and financially -- is bound to be contentious.

Picture of Tracy  Seipel

One year into the explosive, health law-induced growth of Medi-Cal, it appears one of the most alarming predictions of critics is coming true: The supply of doctors hasn't kept up with demand.

Picture of Kathleen O'Brien

New Jersey's health care safety net for poor families was strained even before the ACA offered states money to expand Medicaid. The rate it pays doctors is among the lowest of any state in the nation. That can make it hard for patients to get the timely care they need.

Picture of SE Ruckman

Despite living in a state where Medicaid was not expanded, Oklahoma’s 38 federally recognized tribes have found a way to state tribal liaison Sally Carter. And she has found her way to them.

Picture of Timothy  Darragh

A strongly reported series examining a new program targeting 'super-utilizers' in Pennsylvania debunks a number of myths about the system's sickest and most vulnerable patients. Timothy Darragh tells the story behind the story and the lessons he learned along the way.

Picture of Lisa Morehouse

Despite the Affordable Care Act, there are still millions of Californians without health insurance. Undocumented immigrants don’t qualify for Obamacare benefits, while many others find coverage still too expensive or face other obstacles in enrolling.

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