Skip to main content.

Obamacare

Picture of Jennifer Haberkorn

The effort to enroll people in Mississippi illustrates the obstacles the health law must overcome in many parts of the country, particularly in deeply conservative areas.

Picture of Ryan White

What does health reform look like at the ground level? Very different from the typical media diet of enrollment updates and website glitches.

Picture of Eric Whitney

For my fellowship project, I aimed to compare two other states to my home state of Colorado’s approach to the Affordable Care Act. Showing the law actually creating new opportunities in Colorado would be easy. Showing the law not working in a state that's resisting it would be tougher.

Picture of Ryan White

Dr. Robert Ross and Professor Gerald Kominsi offer thought-provoking perspectives on health reform to California journalists at USC Annenberg: the horse-race style coverage of the Affordable Care Act’s bumpy start has a way of obscuring the sheer magnitude of the changes underfoot.

Picture of Ryan White

Readers and editors need and appreciate clear and concise explanations of health reform’s provisions. However, there’s no way you’re going to be able to cover all the complexities and nuances of any given topic in the space you’re allotted.

Picture of Ryan White

The looming March 31 deadline gives ongoing urgency to the efforts of Covered California to refine and improve strategies for reaching groups, such as Latinos and African Americans, whose enrollment numbers have so far lagged.

Picture of Alicia Chang

The Affordable Care Act promises to expand health coverage to millions of Americans who would otherwise go without. Excluded are people living in the U.S. illegally who are barred from signing up and who won't be penalized for not carrying insurance.

Picture of Momo Chang

The fellowship project is looking at outreach to, and enrollment of, limited English speakers in Covered California, our state's version of the Affordable Care Act.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

The data on the much-lauded Patient Centered Medical Home approach, a cornerstone of ACA, shows that it is expensive, onerously bureaucratic, a drain on health care resources, especially for primary care providers, and a distraction from health care delivery.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

Underwhelming results demonstrate that after all the money and effort invested in bureaucracy, Patient Centered Medical Homes do not contribute to actual patient care.

Pages

Announcements

Domestic violence affects tens of millions of Americans every year. Yet media outlets mostly treat incidents as "cops" items, if they cover them at all, as opposed to treating domestic violence as a public health problem. Our free two-day symposium will help journalists understand the root causes and promising prevention, intervention and treatment approaches.  Plus participants will be able to apply for grants to report California-focused projects.

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth