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Obamacare

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The data on the much-lauded Patient Centered Medical Home approach, a cornerstone of ACA, shows that it is expensive, onerously bureaucratic, a drain on health care resources, especially for primary care providers, and a distraction from health care delivery.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

Underwhelming results demonstrate that after all the money and effort invested in bureaucracy, Patient Centered Medical Homes do not contribute to actual patient care.

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Inside the the Harris County Jail is an award-winning Mental Health Unit that functions as a full psychiatric hospital for up to 250 inmates. Outside the jail, Houstonians with mental illness often can’t find those kinds of services.

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In California, the effort to get people signed up for insurance has proceeded with little partisan rancor, and at a quickening pace. December enrollment was nearly four times that of October and November combined. Nonetheless, millions of Californians remain uninsured.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

Patient-Centered Primary Care Medical Homes have been around for decades. The more you know about the intention behind them, the more you wonder, "How could that not be a good idea?" Based on the research, cost of implementation and effect on patient care, the answer I found may surprise you.

Picture of Eric Whitney

GOP leaders say opposition to Obamacare is their No. 1 campaign issue for the midterm election. At the same time, a growing number of Republican states now embrace a major provision of the law — expanding Medicaid, government-funded health benefits for the poor.

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Reporting on Health will cover the momentous effort to broaden health insurance access. Our focus will be on California, a bellwether state widely viewed as a proving ground for Obamacare. Read more about our new “Remaking Health Care: the Affordable Care Blog.”

Picture of Jennifer Haberkorn

April Gomez-Rodriguez hopes Obamacare changes her life. Daniel Hughes says it’s like the health law never happened. The difference between them: one state border.

Picture of Jennifer Haberkorn

About one in four Texans lack health coverage, including one in three Hispanics in the state. If a significant portion of the 6.1 million uninsured here don’t or can’t enroll, national targets could be missed, the new health insurance exchanges could falter and insurance rates could spike.

Picture of Laurie Tarkan

Here's a post I edited for my blog, WellBeeFile, addressing a question I hadn't seen this asked in the media: how will the Affordable Care Act affect divorced women, who often struggle financially? I ran the question by Washington State social and health researcher Bridget Lavelle.

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The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

Nowhere was the massive COVID wave of winter 2021 more devastating than in America’s nursing homes, where 71,000 residents died in the surge. In this webinar, we’ll hear from the lead reporter in the USA Today series "Dying for Care," who will show how an original data analysis and an exhaustive reporting effort revealed a pattern of unnecessary deaths that compounded the pandemic’s brutal toll. Sign-up here!

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