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Obamacare

Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
While shoppers can often find health insurance with affordable premiums, many such plans carry deductibles and out-of-pocket costs that amount to severe punishment for anyone who falls ill.
Picture of Erika Franklin Fowler
The research suggests that less advertising tied to the Affordable Care Act will lead to less informed consumers, fewer online visitors to health exchanges and lower enrollments.
Picture of John Baackes
The CEO of the largest publicly operated health plan in the U.S. makes the case for why we should stop referring to the Affordable Care Act as Obamacare.
Picture of Tracie Potts
As the open enrollment period for health insurance from the nation’s government-run marketplaces opened, Americans found a changed landscape.
Picture of Julio Ochoa
From threats to repeal the Affordable Care Act, to news about rising premiums and President Donald Trump's recent decision to do away with some subsidies, people who don't closely follow the issue are getting lost in the headlines and sound bites.
Picture of Harvey Barkin
Harvey Barkin wrote this story while participating in the USC Center for Health Journalism‘s California Fellowship.  Other stories in the series include: Full-scope Medi-Cal granted to undocumented children below 19 years old but for how long? Isabella's story
Picture of Julio Ochoa
Many Floridians have jobs but can't afford health insurance or to pay out-of-pocket for health care. For those patients, the more than 100 free and charitable clinics in Florida are often their only option for health care.
Picture of Steven Weissman

With no pricing mechanism for health services and no consumer protection, the GOP and Dems jointly fostered the most pernicious case of crony capitalism imaginable.

Picture of Harvey Barkin
Many Filipino undocumented immigrants remain fearful of seeking out helath care, even with the heightened outreach campaign for health care for undocumented children that began in May 2016.

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