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Obamacare

Picture of Sandra Cervantes
Not knowing how the Affordable Care Act will be changed and the possibility that Congress and President Trump will repeal it without an adequate replacement has many Latinos worried.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
The Affordable Care Act has done far less to control health care costs than many media accounts would lead you to believe. Columnist Trudy Lieberman shows how reporters can cut through the spin.
Picture of Harvey Barkin
Cristina Sprague, a nurse practitioner in San Francisco, says the irony for many Filipino caregivers is that they often work 16-hour shifts as care providers but can’t provide care for their own children.
Picture of Ryan White
Conservatives have long taken issue with Obamacare’s requirement that plans cover maternity care, and now they're in a position to do something about it.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
A former journalist and single mother of two fears that changes to the Affordable Care Act could eliminate the coverage her family depends on to manage their complex health needs.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Speakers Joseph Antos of the American Enterprise Institute, MIT's Jonathan Gruber, and Politico health care reporter Jennifer Haberkorn help us sort through the massive changes on the health reform horizon.
Picture of David Lansky
Amid talk of ACA repeal, the signs suggest that the new Congress and president will diminish the emphasis on value-based health care. Here's what reporters should keep in mind.
Picture of Cristine Felt

Obamacare has been a hot topic in politics since day one: it’s been a subject to many debates, mainly in means of whether or not it’s only well-intentioned and good on paper.

Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
The failures of the national conversation during the run-up to Obamacare's passage are now hastening its demise, with too few Americans seeing firsthand benefits.
Picture of Gerardo Fernandez Moreno
Rufino Jiménez is a legal U.S. resident who pays $17 a month for health insurance he receives through his employer. But he does not have time to go see a doctor — he doesn't even have time to stop and eat his lunch. His struggles are far from unique.

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