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Obamacare

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New projections estimate that Obamacare will add more than a quarter-billion dollars in administrative costs by 2022. About two thirds of this added expense will go to private insurance companies via the insurance exchanges. In contrast, public insurance gives far more bang for the buck.

Picture of Judy  Silber

The high-deductible health plans sold under the "bronze" banner may look lousy at first glance. But while they may not be ideal coverage, they're far better than the high deductible plans sold before Obamacare. And they can supply a critical lifeline when misfortune strikes.

Picture of Daniel Chang

Why won’t Florida adopt Medicaid expansion? The Florida Senate has proposed a plan, but House leaders and Gov. Rick Scott oppose any Medicaid expansion because they say they don’t trust the federal government to keep its promise to pay for covering more Floridians.

Picture of Daniel Chang

Without Medicaid expansion, South Florida’s low-income residents have found out the hard way that the healthcare safety net designed to catch people before they hit bottom is no substitute for insurance.

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Miami-Dade County does not have the money to cover the potential loss of $200 million a year in federal funding that helps Jackson Health System, the county’s public hospital network, provide medical care for the uninsured and Medicaid patients, Mayor Carlos Gimenez said Tuesday.

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With legislators seemingly deadlocked on Medicaid expansion in Florida, residents in the “coverage gap” are stitching together their medical care through personal ingenuity, half doses of medicines and low-cost clinics. It’s exhausting work, especially when you’re sick.

Picture of Lisa   Bernard-Kuhn

The newly Republican-controlled Congress isn’t wasting time to take sharp aim at President Barack Obama’s health reform law. Here’s a look at the top bills, lawsuits and debates that could mean major changes.

Picture of Lisa   Bernard-Kuhn

As hundreds of thousands of residents across the region put new health care benefits to the test, doctors and hospitals are reporting a mixed bag of gains and growing pains.

Picture of Lisa   Bernard-Kuhn

In Southwest Ohio and Northern Kentucky, more than 85,600 residents have enrolled into the new Medicaid benefits in the last year. The expansion has been a boon for community health centers and safety net providers that for decades have discounted care or forgone payments from uninsured patients.

Picture of Lisa   Bernard-Kuhn

Larry Keller doesn’t mince words when it comes to how he feels about the country’s health law. “A typical Cincinnati conservative would rather slit his wrists than consider a so-called Obamacare policy," he said. "But no exaggeration, I wouldn't be here if it weren't for the Healthcare.gov website."

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