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Office of Minority Health

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Baltimore is no stranger to violence, but in recent weeks it hit proportions that stunned even a city often numb to regular shootings and stabbings. Violence puts pressure on hospital emergency rooms and paramedics. Many victims don’t die and will stress the entire health system for years to come.

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Richmond, Va.'s, communities differ vastly in the resources available for residents to pursue good health, and the result is a 12-year or more gap in average life expectancy in neighborhoods just miles apart.

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The anti-immigrant sentiment that some Latinas in Georgia are experiencing has led some women to refrain from scheduling routine medical exams that could save their lives.

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For many Mexican immigrants living in New York, working multiple jobs leaves little time for regular exercise. In addition, a heavy reliance on public transportation and a lack of rural areas means that physical activity is virtually nonexistent. Health experts cite this sedentary lifestyle as an emerging gateway to diabetes, especially among immigrants.

This story was originally published in Spanish. Below is the English translation.

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Murray Penner is the Deputy Executive Director of Domestic Programs at the National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors (NASTAD). Penner's primary responsibilities include oversight of the Care and Treatment, Prevention, Viral Hepatitis and Racial/Ethnic Health Disparities programs, including oversight of cooperative agreements with HRSA, CDC and the Office of Minority Health (OMH). Penner also oversees overall responsibility for NASTAD's National ADAP Monitoring and Technical Assistance program, which includes production of the National ADAP Report.

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The health concerns of African-Americans are varied and critical. African-American men have the highest death rate of all racial and ethnic groups, male and female. The 10 leading causes of death for African-Americans are: heart disease; cancer; stroke; diabetes; unintentional injuries; homicide; nephritis, nephritic syndrome and nephrosis; chronic lower respiratory disease; HIV/AIDS and septicemia. There is also a high prevalence of hypertension, infant mortality and tuberculosis.

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