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Oregon

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While many states make information related to medical care complications public, Oregon does not. That means that the best information about an individual hospital’s quality and safety may be kept from the public.

Picture of Betsy  Cliff

Each year thousands of patients are harmed by medical care in Oregon. A Bend woman, Mary Parker, was one.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

New colon cancer screening guidelines, a new study on using anti-depressants during pregnancy, new drug tests for sailors and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Suzanne Gordon

Atul Gawande, surgeon and staff writer for The New Yorker, is one of the most prominent voices speaking about patient safety in the United States. But in his latest New Yorker contribution, "Personal Best: Should everyone have a coach?," the "everyone" in question here is, not surprisingly, just the physician.

Picture of Bill Graves

About 70 percent of the state’s more than 50,000 Native Americans live in Multnomah County, home to Oregon’s largest city, Portland, and have rates of health problems from infant mortality to AIDS that far exceed the general population.

Picture of William Heisel

Every time Public Citizen ranks state medical boards for their effectiveness, some official will say that it is an unfair assessment because state boards all work differently in overseeing doctors. This is partly true — and it is also part of the problem.

 

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Public health officials are increasingly concerned about the rising numbers of women entering pregnancy overweight or obese. Get context and ideas for covering this story in your community. 

Picture of William Heisel

Dr. David C. Martin may be onto something. In three Antidote posts last week, he made the case that health care workers should not wear surgical scrubs out in public. If seen doing so, they should be confronted. Now, doctors are talking back. 

Picture of Christina Elston

What is air pollution doing to our kids? The air we breathe gets plenty of media coverage, but we tend to consider it more of an inconvenience than an emergency. Yet at every stage of children’s lives – from their time in the womb until they’re ready to leave the nest – the pollution in the air affects their health.

Picture of Alison Knezevich

On a tie vote, state senators on Thursday rejected a proposal to require a prescription for cold and allergy medicines containing pseudoephedrine.

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