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Oregon

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Medical boards from coast to coast are inconsistent, inefficient and ill equipped to monitor the hundreds of thousands of doctors licensed under their watch, Antidote’s investigation of every state board has found. There are some standouts, but, overall, they do a terrible job protecting patients and informing the public.

It bears repeating that most doctors do a great job and are focused on one thing: helping their patients heal and lead healthier lives. The mission of this tour was to explore what happens to that minority of doctors who don’t follow the rules.

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Blue Cross of California awards $69 million in bonuses to in-state physican groups.

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One of the reasons that state medical boards frown on doctors who start relationships with their patients is because of the power differential. The doctor is in a position of authority, like a teacher or a preacher, and is not supposed to abuse that position by using it, even in a subtle way, to coerce a patient into intimacy.

Dr. Gregory Gomez was not subtle about it.

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Maxine Liggins is an Area Medical Director for the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. The Service Planning Areas in which she works include the wealthiest and the poorest residents of Los Angeles County. Public Health’s mission of “improving the quality of life for the residents of Los Angeles County” serves as a yardstick to measure the quality of health services provided in the Los Angeles County. Dr.

Picture of Angilee Shah

The annual convention of the Asian American Journalists Association (AAJA) early in August was filled from top to bottom with practical and career-oriented sessions. For me, one of the most useful was off the official books. By Twitter and email, AAJA Texas chapter president Iris Kuo organized a lunchtime get-together for freelancers in the hotel lobby.

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The Portland Tribune's Peter Korn takes a look at why some Oregon residents are turning to naturopathic doctors for their primary care.

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For the past year and a half, Julie Sullivan at the Oregonian, one of the country’s most consistent and skilled investigative reporters, has been writing about troops that were exposed to the cancer-causing chemical hexavalent chromium in Iraq.

Picture of William Heisel

The American Society of Anesthesiologists wants to change the way people think about pain medicine, both to promote the idea that anesthesiologists are not just experts in the surgical suite and also to prevent addictions and deaths.

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A special report to The Filipino Press

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U.S. children and teens have struggled with increasing rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior for much of the past decade. Join us as we explore the systemic causes and policy failures that have accelerated the crisis and its inequitable impact, as well as promising community-driven approaches and evidence-based practices. The webinar will provide fresh ideas for reporting on the mental health of youth and investigating the systems and services. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors and a social media consultant to join its team. Learn more about the positions and apply.

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