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Why is health care in California's prisons still so inadequate after a court order and billions of dollars in spending? Answers and more in our Daily Briefing.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

Most Americans know what's killing us. Stop smoking, eat better, exercise, and wear your seatbelt — just those four simple steps, alone, could save hundreds of thousands of lives every year. Here are 10 ways to help people hear that message.

Picture of Kelley Atherton

Del Norte County has a serious problem with tooth decay. In fact, the problem is spread across California — a recent study found that two-thirds of the state’s children have some form of tooth decay. Kelley Atherton finds out why.

Picture of Kimber Solana

Joel Aguilar has never been a gang member, but has three bullets in him nonetheless. The east Salinas teenager is largely paralyzed: He can move his neck, raise both his arms a few inches and move one wrist — the physical toll of a "gang-related" shooting that nearly killed him two years ago. Kimber Solana examines the psychological impact of gang violence on both victims and the community.

Picture of Hillary Meeks

A look into why Tulare County, a poor, semi-rural county in California's Central Valley, has a severe lack of physicians.

Picture of Andrew Schorr

It’s happening several times a day now. “My friend may have a brain tumor.” “I have been short of breath.” “What do you think I should do?” I am not a doctor, but people are increasingly looking to me as if I were one. It’s a little daunting.

Picture of Mary Otto

The Deamonte Driver Dental Project was real. It was here. Yet the job of bringing adequate dental care to the poor children of Prince George's County would not be a simple one. State and national public-health officials have been grappling with the same challenges: to educate both poor people and dentists; to address the historic breach between oral health care and the rest of health care; to confront the vast gaps in the dental public-health system.

Picture of Alison Knezevich

West Virginia officials say they're disappointed that Florida's governor wants to kill a planned prescription drug monitoring program in the Sunshine State, which is a destination for people who deal pills.

Picture of Mark Taylor

This story is Part 8 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

Gary resident Teresa Johnson said she recognizes the woman in the “before” pictures and remembers her pain.

Johnson, 50, who worked with developmentally disabled adults in Lake and Porter counties before becoming disabled, said she has been overweight all her life.

“I had very little success losing weight on my own,” she said. “I’d lose weight and then gain it right back. But last year I needed a knee replacement surgery and didn’t want to have it while I was still morbidly obese.”

Picture of Mark Taylor

Journalist Mark Taylor examines how one Gary, Indiana emergency room continues to serve some of the sickest and neediest patients in the region, handling more gunshot, knife wound and violent trauma cases than other area ERs, alongside the chronically ill.

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The pandemic is far from over but crucial COVID-19 protections and benefits are gone. In our next webinar, we'll explore the end of renter protections, unemployment benefits and other emergency relief, and what it means for the nation’s pandemic recovery and the health and well-being of low-income people and their communities. Glean story ideas and crucial context. Sign-up here!

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States?  Apply now for one of our positions. 

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