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Palo Alto

Picture of Blanca Torres
Demand for mental health services for children has swelled as expressions of anxiety, depression and suicidal thoughts have increased alarmingly.
Picture of Kate Bradshaw
“We have plenty of housing, but we don’t have jobs that are available to employable residents. People have to traverse out of East Palo Alto to go to their workplace."
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Youth homelessness is a growing problem in California cities. Numbers from Santa Clara and Alameda counties show that homeless youth have roughly doubled from just two years ago.
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"Inside Out" is a public radio series that will begin a conversation about the mental health of Asian American Pacific Islanders (AAPIs). These radio and multimedia stories examine the experience and understanding of mental health from the perspective of several Bay Area residents of differing AAPI ethnicities. They reveal barriers to care, like...

Picture of Rebecca Plevin

During the month of April, Vida en el Valle ran a four-part series - called Latinos Protecting La Tierra – about environmental advocates from across the state. Why did we focus on the people fighting the environmental battles, rather than the issue itself?

Picture of Martha Shirk

America has trash pickers, too. A visit to a recycling facility in San Jose, California, suggests numerous health and workplace safety stories for journalists to explore in their communities.

Picture of Erika Cebreros

The lack of support for breastfeeding in hospitals has a bigger effect on low-income mothers. It is common for hospitals to offer formula for newborn babies or separate them from their mothers at birth, without medical reason. Such practices are considered huge barriers to breastfeeding because they hinder the start.

Picture of Jennifer Biddle

One of the happiest moments of 2009 for me personally was when I found out I received a fellowship from the California Endowment to produce a video series on teen suicide.

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The nation’s overdose epidemic has entered a devastating new phase. Drugs laced with fentanyl and even more poisonous synthetics have flooded the streets, as the crisis spreads well beyond the rural, largely white communities that initially drew attention. The death rate is escalating twice as fast among Black people than among white people. This webinar will give journalists deep insights, fresh story ideas and practical tips for covering an epidemic that killed more than 107,000 people in the U.S. last year. Sign-up here!

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