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patient protection

Picture of Lisa   Bernard-Kuhn

The newly Republican-controlled Congress isn’t wasting time to take sharp aim at President Barack Obama’s health reform law. Here’s a look at the top bills, lawsuits and debates that could mean major changes.

Picture of Lisa   Bernard-Kuhn

As hundreds of thousands of residents across the region put new health care benefits to the test, doctors and hospitals are reporting a mixed bag of gains and growing pains.

Picture of Lisa   Bernard-Kuhn

In Southwest Ohio and Northern Kentucky, more than 85,600 residents have enrolled into the new Medicaid benefits in the last year. The expansion has been a boon for community health centers and safety net providers that for decades have discounted care or forgone payments from uninsured patients.

Picture of Lisa   Bernard-Kuhn

Larry Keller doesn’t mince words when it comes to how he feels about the country’s health law. “A typical Cincinnati conservative would rather slit his wrists than consider a so-called Obamacare policy," he said. "But no exaggeration, I wouldn't be here if it weren't for the Healthcare.gov website."

Picture of Lisa   Bernard-Kuhn

Rachel Hill has her diabetes under control after two years of not having insurance. Larry Keller is cancer free after a life-saving surgery, made possible by new insurance coverage. But a glut of new consumers now covered by Medicaid are waiting as much as four months before seeing a doctor.

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April Gomez-Rodriguez hopes Obamacare changes her life. Daniel Hughes says it’s like the health law never happened. The difference between them: one state border.

Picture of Heather Boerner

Undocumented patients and mixed status families pose special challenges for health care providers.

Picture of Elaine Wong

The requirement to for individuals to buy health care is one of the most well-known mandates in the Affordable Care Act. However, there are also many other changes unknown to Chinese community.

Picture of William Heisel

Illinois state lawmaker Mary Flowers plans to resurrect some of the state's patient rights' legislation. Here's how she plans to do it.

Announcements

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

Let us support your next ambitious health reporting project through our National Fellowship program. Apply today.

Nowhere was the massive COVID wave of winter 2021 more devastating than in America’s nursing homes, where 71,000 residents died in the surge. In this webinar, we’ll hear from the lead reporter in the USA Today series "Dying for Care," who will show how an original data analysis and an exhaustive reporting effort revealed a pattern of unnecessary deaths that compounded the pandemic’s brutal toll. Sign-up here!

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