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patient safety

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On Monday, Dr. David C. Martin, a retired Sacramento anesthesiologist, introduced the idea that the public should be on the watch for health care workers wearing hospital scrubs outside of a medical setting, especially in restaurants. Martin's plea for a public health response continues.

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You probably have been to a restaurant near a hospital and seen a doctor, nurse or medical assistant wearing scrubs and standing in line for a sandwich. You probably didn’t give this a second thought, but Dr. David C. Martin thinks you should be alarmed.

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Some good news (finally!) about whooping cough, and a hospital mystery: why was a California hospital named as one of the nation's best when it's being investigated for patient safety problems? 

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Administrators of a hot line that helps West Virginians find treatment for prescription drug abuse are worried the program will be forced to close. The Mountain State has the nation's highest rate of fatal drug overdoses, and most of those deaths involve prescription drugs. But officials with the West Virginia Prescription Drug Abuse Quitline say state leaders have not shown concern for their funding problems. The hot line launched in September 2008 with the help of $1 million from a lawsuit against Purdue Pharma, maker of the painkiller OxyContin. That money will run out next year, said Laura Lander, the program's clinical supervisor.

 

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Check out Antidote blogger William Heisel talking about patient safety on KQED's Health Dialogues program.

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Japan's radiation may have reached California shores, but experts say your health won't be affected. Plus more from our Daily Briefing.

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This story is Part 10 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

Methodist Hospitals’ financial turnaround has impressed hospital analysts and bond ratings agencies.

In May, New York bond-rating firm Standard & Poor’s changed its outlook on Methodist’s long-term bonds from negative to stable, reflecting its “improved operating performance and an improved balance sheet in fiscal 2009.”

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Why do two Central California cities top a new "most toxic" cities list? Plus more from our Daily Briefing.

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The most powerful moment for me while reporting on a recent project on prescription drug abuse deaths was seeing the Rev. Donnie Coots standing among the ruins of his once thriving drug rehabilitation center.

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Consumers Union is offering a great opportunity for people focused on health care and health journalism to make their voices heard.

From now until next Friday, Feb. 25, Consumer Union’s Safe Patient Project will be gathering opinions from people about Medicare’s new Physician Compare site to submit as part of Medicare’s open comment period on the site.

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