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patient safety

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West Virginia lawmakers want Florida's governor to reconsider his plan to drop a prescription monitoring program they say would cut down on pill trafficking.  

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Medicare’s new consumer information site, Physician Compare, promises the same gold mine of data patients find when they use Hospital Compare or Nursing Home Compare. But, unlike those sites, Physician Compare does not keep its promises.

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California’s long-awaited hospital infection data isn’t ready for prime-time.

Last month, journalist Deborah Shoch of our sister program California HealthCare Foundation Center for Health Reporting detailed one woman’s battle to get state officials to release individual hospital infection data.

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Older doctors should not lose their licenses just because they hit a target birthday. But should they have their skills regularly tested after a certain age?

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Although Doctors Behaving Badly tends to focus on exactly what you would expect, its mission is to make people aware of the many ways that patients are left unprotected.

There are nearly 1 million licensed, practicing physicians nationwide. Antidote has no ability to count how many are “behaving badly,” but it is safe to say that only a slim minority are tainting the reputation of the medical community. Doctors who abuse, injure or kill patients are the surrogate markers for an illness in the physician discipline system. They are not the illness.

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Medical boards from coast to coast are inconsistent, inefficient and ill equipped to monitor the hundreds of thousands of doctors licensed under their watch, Antidote’s investigation of every state board has found. There are some standouts, but, overall, they do a terrible job protecting patients and informing the public.

It bears repeating that most doctors do a great job and are focused on one thing: helping their patients heal and lead healthier lives. The mission of this tour was to explore what happens to that minority of doctors who don’t follow the rules.

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Here’s what we’re checking out today:

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This is part of my ongoing effort to highlight great investigative work being done outside Big Media.

Blythe Bernhard and Jeremy Kohler have been writing a series of stories in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch that should be carefully studied by anyone wanting to examine physician discipline in a state, region or nationally. Their latest installment, A felon, fit to practice? Disgraced doctor gets a second chance, started with straightforward top:

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Did 87 California hospitals really go three years without any major patient care mistakes? Answers and more in our Daily Briefing.

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Here are five more great ideas I picked up at the Consumers Union Safe Patient Summit last week in Austin. The first five were

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