Skip to main content.

patient safety

Picture of Apurv Gupta

The probe into ventilator deaths undertaken by The Boston Globe points to "alarm fatigue" as a key reason for failure of these systems.

Picture of William Heisel

When is a story important enough to warrant reporting on a cause of death? Do the deaths of famous people open an opportunity to raise public awareness about medical errors or other health threats? What about the person next door?

Picture of Apurv Gupta

A couple of articles in today's USA Today identify a growing - and seemingly controversial - trend at US hospitals: standardizing approaches to clinical care delivery in order to reduce costs.

Picture of Suzanne Gordon

Atul Gawande, surgeon and staff writer for The New Yorker, is one of the most prominent voices speaking about patient safety in the United States. But in his latest New Yorker contribution, "Personal Best: Should everyone have a coach?," the "everyone" in question here is, not surprisingly, just the physician.

Picture of William Heisel

Victims of bad physician behavior everywhere are rubbing their eyes in disbelief today after Dr. Conrad Murray's conviction in the death of Michael Jackson. Here are five lessons from the case for regulatory agencies, prosecutors, patient advocates and journalists.

Picture of William Heisel

Parkland Memorial Hospital in Dallas is a public hospital. This may surprise you because the hospital has fought so hard to keep secret information about how it spends public resources. Here's how the hospital has tried to stymie the Dallas Morning News' reporting. 

Picture of William Heisel

FDA regulator Paul T. Hardy blew the whistle on problems with a Kodak mammography system — and got fired for his trouble. Here's what happened next.

Picture of Ryan McNeill

Parkland Memorial Hospita has for years been one of the state’s worst-performing hospitals on a broad federal measure of patient safety, a Dallas Morning News analysis shows. Hospital representatives accepted the accuracy of the calculations, but they questioned how well the data reflected actual performance and current hospital conditions. 

 
Picture of Ryan McNeill

To identify rates of potentially preventable medical harm, The Dallas Morning News  analyzed nearly 9 million patient-level records from hospitals across Texas.

Picture of William Heisel

What is happening in the case of two nurses in Winkler County, Texas, should serve as a warning to those who attempt to slap down whistleblowers: you will not win. Here’s a score card of winners and losers in the case so far.

Pages

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth