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This story is Part 14 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

When Shantray Hooks, of Gary, lost her job as a restaurant cook in August, she didn’t know how she would pay for doctor visits.

“I had no health insurance and I couldn’t afford to pay a doctor,” said Hooks, 29, who was diagnosed with diabetes several years ago.

A doctor referred her to the Community Health Net of Gary, a federally qualified community health center that provides comprehensive primary care health services and charges on a sliding fee scale for services.

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This story explores how freeways may cause children in certain Utah neighborhoods to be hospitalized more often. It is a sidebar to the third part of her series on health disparities in Salt Lake City.

Picture of William Heisel

It’s doubtful that so many health journalists would have covered the case of the late Dr. Mel Levine if he had not appeared on Oprah.

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A father who lost his 11-year-old son to leukemia last year is one of five plaintiffs in a suit filed Feb. 15 in the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in Pasadena, Calif., challenging a 1984 federal ban on compensation for donors of bone marrow.

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This story is Part 1 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

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With limited access to affordable fruits, vegetables and other healthy foods, Mexicans living in New York are frequenting fast food restaurants instead of farmers' markets. The result is a spike in obesity and diabetes among this immigrant group.

This story was originally published in Spanish. Below is the English translation.

Part 3: In a sedentary country

Picture of Angilee Shah

Dr. Rishi Manchanda wants to practice smart medicine. From a clinic in South Los Angeles, he told the California Health Journalism Fellows, "It is not smart to take a cockroach out of an ear and just send that child home," Manchanda says.

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Racial disparity in baby death rates is not a new subject. It's a complex, insiduous, and, at times, inflammatory, issue. In my corner of the world, there are communities where the baby death rate is nearly three times the national norm.

Picture of William Heisel

One would think the Dr. Earl Bradley horror show could not get worse.

The Delaware pediatrician was indicted in February on charges he brutally molested more than 100 children in a toy-filled basement.

Then Chris Barrish at the Delaware News Journal showed how even a story this bad could get uglier:

Picture of William Heisel

In the annals of twin research, the twisted story of the identical Blankenburg brothers could fill a volume.

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Announcements

“Racism in medicine is a national emergency.” That’s how journalist Nicholas St. Fleur characterized the crisis facing American health care this spring, as his team at STAT embarked on “Color Code,” an eight-episode series exploring medical mistrust in communities of color across the country. In this webinar, we’ll take inspiration from their work to discuss strategies and examples for telling stories about inequities, disparities and racism in health care systems. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

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