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All Dr. Narinder Kumar had to do to stay in practice was make one phone call a day.

The phone call was a little unusual but straightforward. Kumar, a pediatrician in Davenport, Iowa, had to call a lab with a contract with the Iowa Board of Medicine to find out whether he had to give a urine sample that day. Kumar had agreed to this arrangement in May 2006.

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Sheila Himmel, an award-winning food writer and restaurant reviewer for the San Jose Mercury News, loved to eat. Then her daughter became anorexic, forever changing Himmel's relationship with food and her identity as a journalist. In Hungry: A Mother and Daughter Fight Anorexia, Himmel and her daughter Lisa examine how their family coped with Lisa's serious eating disorder.

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A new study released in the Journal Pediatrics has confirmed what many of us in public health already knew: children whose parents refuse to have them vaccinated are more likely to get and spread pertussis. Some people are likely to say so what. Is pertussis really that common or serious? The answer to both those questions is yes.

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The American Academy of Pediatrics doesn't issue policy statements all that often. When it does, the statements tend to be deeply researched and full of fodder for future stories. That's the case with the "The Built Environment: Designing Communities to Promote Physical Activity in Children," which appears today in the AAP journal Pediatrics.

Picture of William Heisel

Even the most curious of Dr. Barbara Philipp's patients probably didn't notice that she had a drug problem.

That's because her patients were kids.

The Massachusetts Board of Registration in Medicine wrote in its disciplinary report that the 55-year-old Boston pediatrician wrote fake prescriptions for family members and friends just to get painkillers and sleeping pills for herself.

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Dr. Myers is the former Director for the Department of Health and Human Service's National Vaccine Program Office (NVPO) and has an appointment at University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) as the Sealy Center for Vaccine Development's (SCVD) Associate Director for Public Health Policy and Education. Vaccine policy issues that Dr. Myers and the SCVD address are assessing the safety and benefits of new and experimental vaccines and barriers that keep people from getting the vaccines they need.

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James S. Marks, M.D., M.P.H., senior vice president, directs all program and administrative activities of the RWJF Health Group. This includes the Foundation's work in childhood obesity, public health and vulnerable populations. Prior to joining RWJF in December 2004, Marks retired as assistant surgeon general after serving as director of the Centers for Disease Control's National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion for almost a decade.

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