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Pennsylvania

Picture of Lisa Gartner
How Pennsylvania failed to protect boys from abuse at Glen Mills and other state-licensed juvenile programs.
Picture of Richard Lord
The share of children in Pennsylvania living in high-poverty neighborhoods has been steadily growing, according to new data released Monday by The Annie E. Casey Foundation as part of its annual “Kids Count” state-by-state review.
Picture of Richard Lord
The share of children in Pennsylvania living in high-poverty neighborhoods has been steadily growing, according to new data released Monday by The Annie E. Casey Foundation as part of its annual “Kids Count” state-by-state review.
Picture of Lisa Gartner
Pennsylvania is sometimes lauded for how it handles its young offenders. But experts told me children are victimized after being sent away to residential programs.
Picture of Binghui Huang
Binghui Huang wrote this series as a project of the National Health Journalism Fellowship, a program of the University of Southern California's Annenberg School of Journalism.
Picture of Binghui Huang
Binghui Huang wrote this series as a project of the National Health Journalism Fellowship, a program of the University of Southern California's Annenberg School of Journalism.
Picture of Binghui Huang
Binghui Huang wrote this series as a project of the National Health Journalism Fellowship, a program of the University of Southern California's Annenberg School of Journalism.
By Lisa Gartner
"What I heard, over and over again, were stories of physical violence in juvenile residential programs."

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